Archive for tomb

The Wholeness Of The Self

Posted in Dreams of An Enthralling India In Colour with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2013 by designldg

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“Remembering our past, carrying it around with us always, may be the necessary requirement for maintaining, as they say, the wholeness of the self.
To ensure that the self doesn’t shrink, to see that it holds on to its volume, memories have to be watered like potted flowers, and the watering calls for regular contact with the witnesses of the past, that is to say, with friends.
They are our mirror; our memory; we ask nothing of them but that they polish the mirror from time to time so we can look at ourselves in it.”
(From “Identity” by Milan Kundera)

This man was standing at the gate of the mausoleum of the third Mughal emperor, Akbar the Great, located in Sikandra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
He was not young but he was not old either and his face carried emotional wounds with a moving melancholy…

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Life Welling Worth

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

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“I could give you no advice but this: to go into yourself and to explore the depths where your life wells forth.”
(From “Letters to a Young Poet (1934)” by Rainer Maria Rilke – Austro-German lyric poet, 1875-1926)

 

This is the Sheesh Gumbad shot from the Bara Gumbad in the Lodi Gardens in Delhi.
During summers walking in this huge park among the mosque and all the tombs of this Pashtun dynasty which ruled Northern India during the 16th century is always a moment of bliss, mostly when come the monsoon showers…
Then clouds of birds try to defeat the sudden winds in the red sky of fire and from every corner, life is welling forth…

 

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The Gardens of Eden

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2011 by designldg

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“Hail, blessed space happier than the garden of Paradise
Hail lofty buildings higher than the divine throne
A paradise, the garden of which has thousands of Rizwans as servants
A garden of which has thousands of paradise for its land
The pen of the mason of the Divine Deeree has wrotten on its court
These are the gardens of Eden, enter them and Live Forever.”

This is a Persian poem on the third Mughal Emperor’s tomb complex’s entrance gate located in Sikandra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh from where this picture was shot.
This visual metaphor is a reference to paradise.
It was designed and written on the north facade, the side facing the tomb, by Abd al-Haqq Shirazi who was later known as Amanat Khan when he became the designer of inscriptions on several major Mughal monuments including the Taj Mahal.

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Towards Eternity

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2011 by designldg

Towards Eternity

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“May his [Akbar’s] soul shine like the rays of the sun and the moon in the light of God.”
(Final verse of the Persian inscription on the emperor tomb’s entrance gate)

This is one more picture of the third Mughal Emperor’s tomb in Sikandra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
This door shows a long narrow corridor which leads to the basement of the burial chamber where an interior domed chamber contains Akbar the Great’s true sarcophagus.
Although this interior was later whitewashed, it is reported that originally it was painted with Christian subjects including angels and the Virgin Mary, however such images were a matter of fashion and not reflection of religious belief.

Into Light

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2011 by designldg

Into Light

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“Allah is the Protector of those who have faith: from the depths of darkness He will lead them forth into light.”
(From the Holy Quran – 2.257)

Tow lamps are the only furnitures inside the mausoleum complex of the third Mughal emperor Akbar the Great (1542 – 1605).
Therefore it was easy to connect this picture with those symbolic words found in the Holy Quran…
It is located in Sikandra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Abode of Paradise

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2011 by designldg

Abode of Paradise

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“Eden is that old-fashioned house we dwell in every day Without suspecting our abode, until we drive away”
(Emily Dickinson – American Poet, 1830-1886)

This is the main room leading to emperor Akbar’s burial place inside the mausoleum located in Sikandra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
In the Akbarnāma (the official chronicle of the reign of Akbar the Great, the third Mughal emperor) this monument is mentioned as Behistan or Behistabad which literally means “Abode of Paradise”.

The Duties of an Emperor

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2011 by designldg

The Duties of an Emperor

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“Emperor Akbar: Though I am a beloved father to a kind son, I can’t ignore the duties of an emperor.
I cannot change the destiny of India for my son’s love. ”
(From the Indian movie “Mughal-e-azam “, 1960)

This Akbar the Great’s cenotaph inside the mausoleum which is located in Sikandra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
Per traditions the true tomb lies below this Mughal architectural masterpiece.

Feeling Eternity

Posted in Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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“We feel and know that we are eternal”.
(Baruch Spinoza – Dutch Philosopher, exponent of the Rationalism, 1632-1677)

The Tomb of Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq is located to the south of Tughlaqabad in New Delhi.
Built by Ghiyasuddin Tughlak during 1321-25, it is an impressive structure with red sandstone with the walls being sloppy.
Pentagonal walls enclose the tomb giving an impression of a fort.
In here sleeps not only Ghiyas-ud-din but also his wife, Makh Dumai Jahan and his second son Mahmud Khan, who died with him under the pavilion.

The mausoleum itself is very simple like a warrior’s tomb, with the same sloping red sandstone walls which are Tughlaq hallmarks.
Each wall has arched gateways decorated with latticework and white marble and the dome is entirely of white marble.
This rather severe tomb does allow itself a few inscribed panels, arch borders, latticework screens and ‘lotus-bud’ edges which decorate it.
Towards the left of the entrance, in the corridor, there is a tiny grave which is said to be that of the sultan’s favorite dog; which is not exactly a typical thing for a Muslim, who consider dogs unclean, to do.

Ghiyas ud-Din Tughluq’s (غیاث الدین تغلق) real name was Ghazi Malik, he was the founder and first ruler of the Turkic Muslim Tughluq dynasty in India, who reigned over Sultanate of Delhi (Sep, 08, 1320 – Feb, 1325).
He has been the founder of the third city of Delhi called Tughluqabad.
His mother was Hindu.
He had established himself as a great ruler.
He removed corrupt officials from his administration and reformed the judiciary and all existing police departments.
He also reduced the land revenue to 1/10 of the produce.
He was an efficient administrator and a capable military commander and introduced a number of reforms for his welfare of his subjects and suppressed revolts in distant provinces.
He restored peace and stability in the Delhi Sultanate.

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Converting dreams into reality

Posted in Ethereal Dreams with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2009 by designldg

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Last afternoon it was already very hot in Delhi, I was with some friends and we went to Humayun’s tomb which is a complex of buildings in Mughal architecture located in Nizamuddin East.
Over there we could enjoy some cool wind coming from the gardens intersected by watercourses and it was for a while something close to an Eden dream.
It is said that the architecture of the mausoleum inspired Shah Jahan for the construction of the Taj Mahal.

“Anarkali: Don’t snatch my dreams from my eyes, I’ll die.
Prince Saleem: Anarkali! I’ll convert those dreams into reality…”
from the movie “Mughal-E-Azam” (1960)

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Safdarjung’s Tomb

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2009 by designldg

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Safdarjung Tomb is one of the most magnificent tombs of India, situated in the capital city of Delhi.
The mausoleum serves as the last resting place of Safdarjung, the governor of Awadh and later the powerful Prime Minister of Mughal Emperor Muhammad Shah who was the weak Mughal emperor from 1719 to 1748.
It was built under the aegis of Nawab Shuja-ud-Daulah, Safdarjung’s son.
Safdarjang Tomb dates back to the year 1753 and lies at the Lodi Road of New Delhi, near the Safdarjung Airport.

Surrounded by blooming gardens, the entire complex of Safdarjung tomb covers an area of approximately 300 sq km. The garden of the tomb has been designed as per the Charbagh style of the Mughal gardens.
It is also said that tomb of Safdar Jung is built almost on the same pattern as the Humayun’s tomb.
The mausoleum represents that time when the Mughal style of architecture was almost on the road to its downfall.

Safdarjung tomb has been constructed out of red sandstone and buff stone.
Along with Safdarjung, the tomb also houses the remains of his wife.
There are eight rooms surrounding the central chamber of the mausoleum, which is square in its shape.
All the apartments in the Safdarjang Tomb, with the exception of the corner ones, are rectangular in shape.
The corner ones have been built in the shape of an octagon.

Supporting the dome of the mausoleum is a sixteen-sided base. Exceptionally splendid pavilions are situated on the either side of the Safdarjung tomb.
They are known as ‘Moti Mahal’ (Pearl Palace), ‘Jangli Mahal’ (Sylvan Palace) and ‘Badshah Pasand’ (Emperor’s Favorite). The tomb of Safdar Jung has been criticized numerous times for its weakness in proportions, which has led to a lack of balance in its make-up.

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