Archive for stupa

Many Ways to Worship

Posted in Buddhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 6, 2013 by designldg

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“I’ve learned much from the land of many gods and many ways to worship. 
From Buddhism the power to begin to manage my mind, from Jainism the desire to make peace in all aspects of life, while Islam has taught me to desire goodness and to let go of that which cannot be controlled. 
I thank Judaism for teaching me the power of transcendence in rituals and the Sufis for affirming my ability to find answers within and reconnecting me with the power of music. 
Here’s to the Parsis for teaching me that nature must be touched lightly, and the Sikhs for the importance of spiritual strength….
And most of all, I thank Hinduism for showing me that there are millions of paths to the divine.” 
(From “Holy Cow” by Sarah Macdonald)

This is a close-up of a part of the Dhamek Stupa in Sarnath located at 13 km away from Varanasi (Benaras).
The Dhamek Stupa is said to mark the spot of a deer park (Rishipattana) where the Buddha gave the first sermon to his five disciples after attaining enlightenment, “revealing his Eightfold Path leading to nirvana”.
In its current shape, the stupa is an impressive cylinder of bricks and stone reaching a height of 43.6 meters and having a diameter of 28 meters (128 feet high and 93 feet in diameter).
The basement seems to have survived from Ashoka’s structure: the stone facing is chiseled and displays delicate floral carvings of Gupta origin. 
The wall is covered with exquisitely carved figures of humans and birds, as well as inscriptions in the Brāhmī script.
This picture was shot at the time of a visit of his Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama.

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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Shaped by the Light

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

 

 

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“There is no closed figure in nature.
Every shape participates with another.
No one thing is independent of another, and one thing rhymes with another, and light gives them shape.”
(Henri Cartier-Bresson – French photographe, 1908–2004)

This was shot as I was climbing the hillock leading to Shey Gompa (monastery) and Palace in a land of freezing winds among the rocks and peebles of the cold desert shaped by the light…

The palace, mostly in ruins now, was used as a summer retreat by the kings of Ladakh.
The Namgyals abandoned the place and fled to Stok on the opposite side of the Indus River when the Dogras of Jammu invaded Ladakh in 1842.

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The Valley of Stupas

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 13, 2009 by designldg

The Valley of Stupas

 

“You don’t need to visualize the Lama,
For he is inseparable from you;
You don’t need to remember anything,
For he is always in your heart.”
(from My Crazy Tale, An Autobiographical Poem by H.H. the XIIth Gyalwang Drukpa)

This valley of stupas is on the way to Stok palace, the current residence of the royal family of Ladakh.
This amazing Hiamalyan landscape is a poetry of nature following the Indus river through stony hills.

Teacher of the Snowy Realms

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 10, 2009 by designldg

Teacher of the Snowy Realms

 

“To the great teachers of the snowy realms
And emanations of former times,
To their play of knowledge and compassion,
Like the dancing reflection of the moon in water,
I pay homage”.
(from My Crazy Tale, An Autobiographical Poem by H.H. the XIIth Gyalwang Drukpa)

It was almost seven o’clock in the morning when I took this picture at Thiksey Gompa, a Tibetan monastery in the Ladakhi Himalayan hills.
This Buddhist monk was leaving a temple, a few meters further he met a group of kids and they went together to a classroom.

Dwelling Minds Forever

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 10, 2009 by designldg

Dwelling Minds Forever

 

While climbing to Sheh Palace I saw those stupas on my left facing the Himalayan hills of Ladakh.

The Tibetan word for Stupa is Chorten (མཆོད་རྟེན༏), which means “the basis of offering”.
A stupa is a mound-like structure containing Buddhist relics, once thought to be places of Buddhist worship, typically the remains of a Buddha or saint.
Fundamentally, a stupa is essentially made up of the following five constituent parts: a square base, a hemispherical dome, a conical spire, a crescent moon, a circular disc
Each component is rich in metaphoric content. 
For example, “the shape of the stupa represents the Buddha, crowned and sitting in meditation posture on a lion throne. 
The components of the stupa are also identified with the five elements – earth, water, fire, air, and space – held to constitute the fabric of manifest existence.

“When a great teacher passes away, his body is no more, but to indicate that his mind is dwelling forever in an unchanging way in the dharmakaya, one will erect a stupa as a symbol of the mind of the buddhas”
( HH Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche)

Searching for Enlightenment

Posted in Ethereal Dreams with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 12, 2009 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

This is a picture of the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya which was built next to the Bodhi Tree where Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, attained enlightenment, it is located in the Indian state of Bihar.

According to the Jataka tale, when Buddha first came here, the Papilla, or Indian fig (Bodhi) was a massive tree.
It stood at the centre of a mandala composed of a silver white sandy ridge, encircled by creepers and a grassy woodland with all the trees inclining towards the Bo tree that stood in the middle.
Close by were the pure, glassy waters of the Neranjara river, with many pleasant bathing pools.
When he sat down in front of it facing East, a long vista opened out to through an avenue of Sale trees to the glistening beach of the crystal Neranjara.

After he left, he never looked back, and never visited again.
But he did recommend it as one of the four memorable places worth visiting for inspiration.
Buddhist believe this is the navel of the universe, the vajra seat, where past and future buddhas achieve the ultimate state.

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