Archive for rajput

Working with Atmosphere

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“Technique undoubtedly helps make photography magical, but I prefer to work with atmosphere.
I think that the obsession with technique is a male thing.
Boy’s toys.
They love playing… but once you’ve perfected something you have to start searching for a new toy.
I would rather search for a new model or location.”
(Ellen von Unwerth – German photographer and director, b.1954)

This is a view of a side of Man Singh Palace, one of the most beautiful structures in the Gwalior Fort.
The fortress stands on an isolated rock, overlooking the Gwalior town, in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

Within its rich history Gwalior Fort occupies a unique place in the human civilization as the place which has the first ever recorded use of zero.

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The Beauty of the Morning

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Earth hath not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty:
This City now doth, like a garment, wear
The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,
Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first splendor, valley, rock, or hill;
Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! The very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!”
(“Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802” by William Wordsworth, 1770-1850)

This view of Gwalior was shot from a window of the Karna Mahal, the palace next to Man Singh Palace, which stands on an isolated rock overlooking the city in Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

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Imperfect Beauty

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“There is desire in the perfect, beauty in the imperfect.
Thus I lust over the flawless,
and fall amorously forceless to the flawed.”
(From “Reminiscence of the Present: Spiritual Encounters of the Analytically Insane” by Ilyas Kassam)

North to Man Singh Palace, the magnificent and main palace in Gwalior Fort, lie a few ruined Mughal palaces.
This picture was shot inside the Karna Mahal which was the palace of the maternal uncle of the most famous Tomar Rajput kings of Gwalior State (today in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh).
The Karna Mahal was built in pure Hindu style during the 15th century.
It is a long two-storeyed building (200’x200′) with a large assembly hall and a bathing arrangement for women (hammam).

This is the fascinating kingdom of a world in decay where flows a unique beauty curiously flawed by time…
(With special regards to Ilyas Kassam for allowing me to use his poetry with my images)

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The Oilman’s Temple

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“If we want a love message to be heard, it has got to be sent out.
To keep a lamp burning, we have to keep putting oil in it.”
(Mother Teresa of Calcutta – Albanian born Indian Missionary. Nobel Prize for Peace in 1979. 1910-1997)

The Telikā Mandir or “oil-man’s temple” located in the complex of Gwalior fort, in Gwalior in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, was built in the late eighth century.
Elevating to the height of 100 feet ( about 30m), Teli Ka Mandir is the tallest temple in the confines of the Fort.
The building was erected just as the Gurjara Pratihāras were asserting their power over central India.
It is actually dedicated to Lord Vishnu in the form of his mount, Garuda and this unusual image makes the circlet of the doorway.
The structure of this Rajput temple presents a perfect fusion of the northern and southern architectural styles of India.
The ‘shikhar’ (spire) of the temple is undeniably Dravidian in its style, whereas the ornamentation is done in the Nagara style (specific to North India).
Unlike other temples, Oilman’s Temple doesn’t have any ‘mandap’ or pillared hall.
The temple comprises a sanctum sanctorum accompanied by a porch and a doorway imprinted with elaborate carvings (amorous couples, coiled serpents, gods and goddesses).
The weird and wonderful arrangement of two architectural styles show how Teli Ka Mandir boasts about the heritage and rich culture of India.

“Teli Ka Mandir” sounds as an unusual term, but it has several theories behind its name.
According to one of the legends, Rashtrakuta Govinda III seized the Gwalior Fort in 794.
He handled the service of religious ceremonies and rituals to Telang Brahmins and as a result of this, the temple acquired its name.
Another legend says that oil merchants or the men of Teli Caste took the initiative of temple’s construction and due to it, the temple got its name.
The third speculation reveals that name is linked with Telangana region of Andhra Pradesh.
This revelation also approves with the synthesis of Dravidian and North Indian architectural styles.

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Between Zero and Infinity

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“God is the tangential point between zero and infinity”
(Alfred Jarry – French writer, 1873-1907)

This is a view of the back of Man Singh Palace in Gwalior, in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
Gwalior Fort was built in the 8th century and stands on an isolated rock overlooking the city.
It is said that the Mughal Emperor Babur (1483–1531) described it as, “The pearl in the necklace of the forts of Hind”.

Gwalior Fort also occupies a unique place in the human civilization as the place which has the first recorded use of zero ever.
Also referred as ‘Shunya’ in sanskrit, this site is of mathematical interest because of what is written on a tablet recording the establishment of a small 9th century Hindu temple on the eastern side of the plateau (marked by the ‘0’ on the nineteenth century map at the left).
By accident, it records the oldest “0” in India for which one can assign a definite date.

Gwalior occupies a strategic location in the Gird region of India, and the city and its fortress have served as the center of several of historic northern Indian kingdoms.
The Gwalior Fort has changed hands many times, from the Tomaras in the 8th century it passed on to the Mughals, then the Marathas under the Scindia’s (1754), followed briefly by Lakshmi Bai of Jhansi, Tatiya Tope and the British.

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Endless Time

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“Time is endless in thy hands, my lord.
There is none to count thy minutes.

Days and nights pass and ages bloom and fade like flowers.
Thou knowest how to wait.

Thy centuries follow each other perfecting a small wild flower.

We have no time to lose,
and having no time we must scramble for a chance.
We are too poor to be late.

And thus it is that time goes by
while I give it to every querulous man who claims it,
and thine altar is empty of all offerings to the last.

At the end of the day I hasten in fear lest thy gate be shut;
but I find that yet there is time. ”
(“Endless Time” by Rabindranath Tagore- Indian Poet, Playwright and Essayist, Won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, 1861–1941)

This is a window of the Jahangiri Mahal in Orchha which is located in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

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“But my Soul”

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 25, 2010 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“For it was not into my ear you whispered, but into my heart.
It was not my lips you kissed, but my soul.”
(Judy Garland – American actress and singer, 1922–1969)

This was shot from the Chaturbhuj Temple situated in Orchha, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
This spacious Temple, enormous as any European cathedral was almost empty.
There was a young couple inside, they were engaged, not married yet but obviously deeply in love.
When they saw me coming they stopped holding their hands and whispering to each other.
They asked for a picture and took stricking formal poses.
A few minutes later as they were leaving the sanctuary, I saw the young lady standing at the gate, she was ajusting her sari with grace, like a fairy.
All around seemed to look a Bollywood set, even the “love” graffitis on the wall added an unreal touch to this dreamy atmosphere and it became a moment of magic framed in an everlasting sunset…

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Mystery at Dusk

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2010 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Mystery is a resource, like coal or gold, and its preservation is a fine thing.”
(Tim Cahill – American writer, b. 1944)

This is a view from the Chaturbhuj Temple in Orchha which is located in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
This unusual Hindu temple built between the years 1558 and 1573 is dedicated to the four-armed deity, Chaturbhuj (chaturbhuj literally means four-armed).
Maharani Ganesh Kunwar, wife of Orchha’s ruler, Raja Madhukar, constructed the temple to specifically house an idol of Lord Rama.
While she was persuading the Lord to travel from his abode in Ayodhya to Orchha, he expressed the desire not to be displaced from the place he’d made his home.
The queen already had an idol of Rama installed in Rani Niwas (her private apartments), and when the Chaturbhuj Temple was completed, she decided to move the deity there.
According to Orchha folklore, Lord Rama refused to move.
The king immediately realised that his wife was honour-bound not to move the idol, and saved the day by installing the idol of Chaturbhuj (Lord Vishnu with four arms) in the temple instead.
That is how the shrine became the Chaturbhuj Temple.
Raja Madhukar Shah provided a kalasha or horn-shaped crown, made of over 100 pounds of pure gold, on top of the temple.
However a few years later robbers made off with the kalasha.
This is the legend associated with the Chaturbhuj Temple…

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A Static Idea of Life

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 10, 2010 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“There are men whose idea of life is tactic, who long for its continuation after death only because of their wish for permanence and not perfection; they love to imagine that the things to which they are accustomed will persist for ever.
They complete.”
(Rabindranath Tagore – Indian author, Nobel Prize of Literature in 1913, 1861-1941)

This is a view from a window of the Jahangiri Mahal in Orchha which is located in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
The Jahangir Mahal is an example of Rajput Bundela architecture, it was built by the Bundela king Bir Singh Deo and named after the Mughal emperor Jahangir who spent one night here.
It was during this period that Orchha reaches its height and the many extant palaces are a reminder of its architectural glory.

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From a Mesmeric Influence

Posted in 3 - RED HALO with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 27, 2009 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

This is a close-up of a linen throw with a two tones aari embroidery inspired by Emperor Akbar’s wife, Jodhabai.

Since last season our collections are influenced by the Mughals and the Rajputs styles on which we give a contemporary touch.
It also allows to use traditional local artcrafts technics.
(Throw style “Jodha” / RED HALO – Summer 09)

We decided that our favourite model Anand will be overpowering our new campaign.

The photo shoot took two days and I used a natural light only as we did it on the upper terrace which is at our office in Varanasi (Benaras).

“Like” the RED HALO page on Facebook and join this amazing human adventure in Varanasi,www.facebook.com/redhalo.in

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