Archive for rajasthan

Dreams Without Measure

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 28, 2013 by designldg

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“When you were a wandering desire in the mist, I too was there, a wandering desire.
Then we sought one another, and out of our eagerness dreams were born.
And dreams were time limitless, and dreams were space without measure.”
(Kahlil Gibran – Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer, 1883-1931)

The City Palace is a palace complex in Udaipur, the City of Lakes, in the Indian state Rajasthan.
It was built by the Maharana Udai Singh in 1559 in a flamboyant fusion of Rajasthani and Mughal architectural styles and stands on a hill top that gives a panoramic view of the city and the Lake Pichola.
This picture was shot in the Audience Room of the maharaja’s apartments and symbolizes what I always dreamt of India when I was younger.
Each time I have an opportunity to escape for a few days to Udaipur, I come back there and the dream is untouched, flawless and without measure…

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Closed In A room

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 28, 2013 by designldg

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“Closed in a room, my imagination becomes the universe, and the rest of the world is missing out.”
(Criss Jami – American poet, existentialist philosopher and lead singer of the rock band Venus in Arms, b. 1987)

The City Palace is a palace complex in Udaipur, the City of Lakes, in the Indian state Rajasthan.
It was built by the Maharana Udai Singh in 1559 in a flamboyant fusion of Rajasthani and Mughal architectural styles and stands on a hill top that gives a panoramic view of the city and the Lake Pichola.
This picture was shot in the maharaja’s apartments.
Join the photographer atwww.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

An Escape Route

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 2, 2013 by designldg

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“I wanted it to provide an escape route, I wanted to make pictures that were fantastic and took you into another world, one that was brighter.
I started off with this idea”
(David LaChapelle – American photographer and film director, b.1963)

This was shot in the first courtyard of Amber fort located in Amer, a town nearby Jaipur in the Indian state of Rajasthan.
These elephants allows to climb the hill on a narrow passage and to reach the palace.
It was early in the morning when the moon was still at sight…

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

The Unlocked Door

Posted in Studies & Sketches through the lens with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 16, 2013 by designldg

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“I’ve got the key to my castle in the air, but whether I can unlock the door remains to be seen.”
(From “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott, 1832–1888)

This is one of the four painted doorways representing the seasons in Pritam Chowk (the Court of the Beloved) inside the City Palace of Jaipur, the capital of Rajasthan.

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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Never Opened Door

Posted in Studies & Sketches through the lens with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 16, 2013 by designldg

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“Footfalls echo in the memory, down the passage we did not take, towards the door we never opened, into the rose garden.”
( T.S. Eliot – American/British Author, 1888-1965)

This door is in one of the yards of the City Palace of Jaipur, the capital of Rajasthan.

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Monkey see, monkey do

Posted in In Search of Lost Time with tags , , , , , , on February 17, 2009 by designldg

This is a portrait of a gray langur.

Gray langurs are large and fairly terrestrial, inhabiting open wooded habitats and urban areas on the Indian subcontinent. 
Until recently they were considered one species, Semnopithecus entellus; now seven distinct species are recognized. 
When only one species was recognized, it was also called the Hanuman Langur (named after the Hindu vanara divinity Hanuman), the Common Langur and the Entellus Langur.

They are largely gray, with a black face. In Indian mythology, this is because Hanuman, a monkey warrior, burnt his hands and face trying to rescue Lord Rama’s wife. Males are up to 75 cm long, and females 65 cm.

Gray langurs feed on leaves, fruit, buds and flowers. 
Their diet, however, is highly seasonable, with mature leaves being eaten only as a fall-back food during the winter months. 
In the summer, especially before the monsoon season, they are highly frugivorous. 
They also supplement their diet with insects (up to 25% in some months), tree bark and gum.

I saw many in Rajasthan and in the Himalayan hills, they look very cute and they try all their charms in order to get sweets or fruits, but they are very naughty…However I love to play with them.
I shot this one in Chittorgarh, each time I go there it reminds me “The Bandar log” in Kipling’s “Jungle book”… 

 

Monkey see, monkey do

The mahout

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2009 by designldg

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“By a sweet tongue and kindness, you can drag an elephant with a hair”
(Persian Proverb)

A mahout is a person who drives and look after an elephant.

The word mahout comes from the Hindi words mahaut and mahavat, derivatives of the Sanskrit word mahamatra, which means ” having great measure.”A mahout starts very young, usually at about ten years old, when he is assigned an elephant early in its life and they would be attached to each other for the rest of the elephant’s life.

The training of a mahout is similar to a family business, passed down from one generation to the next.
The art of training an elephant is gradually becoming extinct as the job of a mahout is extremely difficult.

This portrait was shot in Udaipur (Rajasthan) where I saw a beautiful “haathi” (elephant in Hindi), which was not making any noise, it was huge and walking in a narrow street with many shops.
Everybody around was smiling, elephants always give happiness to people.
On this image the mahout stands under his haathi’s trump and tusk.

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