Archive for mythology

The Essence of a Man

Posted in 3 - RED HALO with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 9, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Desire is the very essence of man”

(Baruch Spinoza – Dutch Philosopher, 1632-1677)

This scarf has a hand embroidery done by ladies involved in the workshops that we have settled with GURIA, a Human Rights organisation fighting against the sexual exploitation of women and children, particularly those forced into prostitution and trafficking.
Each scarf is unique and made in silk saries provided by many women in Benaras who take this opportunity to get rid of pieces that they don’t want to wear anymore.
Those fabrics carry many stories, most of them were brought in order to celebrate happy moments, festivals or parties and in some ways they still keep traces of that in their yarns…
RED HALO is a collection of household linen based in Benaras (Varanasi – India) providing work to people who were living with difficulties and education to children.
(Scarf style “Kingdom” – 100% silk – Collection RED HALO)

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{New RED HALO shop at HOTEL SURYA ( S-20/51A-5,THE MALL ROAD,CANTONMENT) in VARANASI with the latest collections}
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“Like” the RED HALO page on Facebook and join this amazing human adventure in Varanasi,www.facebook.com/redhalo.in

This scarf was sold during my last photography exhibition and became an “objet of desire” among my friends who visited the show.
Thank you all of you who have been supporting this happy event and therefore helping the Guria ladies.

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The Light that Brings Cold Cheer

Posted in Dreaming a Museum with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 25, 2010 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

“Afar away the light that brings cold cheer
Unto this wall, one instant and no more
Admitted at my distant palace-door.
Afar the flowers of Enna from this drear
Dire fruit, which, tasted once, must thrall me here.
Afar those skies from this Tartarean grey
That chills me: and afar, how far away,
The nights that shall be from the days that were.
Afar from mine own self I seem, and wing
Strange ways in thought, and listen for a sign;
And still some heart unto some soul doth pine,
(Whose sounds mine inner sense is faith to bring,
Continually together murmuring,)
“Woe’s me for thee, unhappy Proserpine!”
(Dante Gabriel Rossetti – Ballads and Sonnets,1881)

One day, Proserpine, a young maid of spring, was out picking wildflowers with her mother, Ceres, goddess of grain when she saw the white petals of the narcissus flower. She began straying far from her mother.
Out of the dark depths sprang Pluto, god of the underworld. He grabbed Proserpine and drove his chariot back into the caves of the earth…
Ceres, devastated by the kidnapping allowed the earth to become barren.
Mercury, the messenger god, wandered the underworld until he came to the misty throne room of Pluto and Proserpine.
There he told Pluto he must return Proserpine.
She remembered the joyful times of her mother’s love, the wildflowers, and open sunlit meadows.
Before returning Proserpine, Pluto offered her the seeds of a pomegranate fruit.
When Ceres heard this, she told Proserpine that the fruit was a symbol of marriage.
As a result, when Fall and Winter come, the earth grows cold and barren because Proserpine must return to the underworld with Pluto.
But when she comes back, Ceres turns the world to spring and summer.
…This is how seasons began.
(Chrysantha Gakopoulos – The story of Ceres and Proserpina)

There is no editing on this picture which was shot at night at the ”Bosquet de la Colonnade” which stands in the gardens of the Château de Versailles.
The green lights were settled for a special evening.
This is a close-up of the famous group “Proserpine Ravished by Pluto” which is in the centre, it was sculpted by François Girardon in 1699.

 

A Tear Drop in the Face of Eternity

Posted in Ethereal Dreams with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2010 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Since many years I wanted to take a few pictures of the Taj Mahal from the other side of the Yamuna river and a few days ago I could at last do it while I was going by car from Delhi to Lucknow.
Rabindranath Tagore once said that this wonder of the world was “A tear drop in the face of eternity”, those words allow me to fly away with the birds and to open a new ethereal dream, under a mysterious moonlight…

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Pranava

Posted in Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2009 by designldg

Pranava

This is a picture of a tile from a temple’s wall in Kashi, the oldest part of Varanasi (Benaras) where ॐ (Om) is written in Devanagari.

Om, often Aum, is a mystical and sacred syllable in the Dharmic religions, Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism, and Jainism.
It is the symbol of the Absolute.
Om is reputed to be the resonant vibrational tone of the non-dualistic universe as a whole.
In Buddhism, Om corresponds to the crown chakra and white light.

Om is known in Sanskrit as praṇava प्रणव, “to sound out loudly” or oṃkāra ओंकार. “oṃ syllable”.
Aum is placed at the beginning of most Hindu texts as a sacred exclamation to be uttered at the beginning and end of a reading of the Vedas or previously to any prayer or mantra.
The Mandukya Upanishad is entirely devoted to the explanation of the syllable.
The syllable is taken to consist of three phonemes, a, u and m, variously symbolizing the Three Vedas or the Hindu Trimurti or three stages in life ( birth, life and death )
The name omkara is taken as a name of God in the Hindu revivalist Arya Samaj.
Similarly, the concept of om, called onkar in Punjabi, is found in Sikh theology as a symbol of God.
It invariably emphasizes God’s singularity, expressed as Ek Onkar (“One Omkara” or “The Aum is One”), stating that the multiplicity of existence symbolized in the aum syllable is really founded in a singular God.

Aum is said to be the primordial sound that was present at the creation of the universe.
It is said to be the original sound that contains all other sounds, all words, all languages and all mantras.

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

The Swan of my Mind

Posted in Chiaroscuro with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2009 by designldg

The Swan of my Mind

 

“Oh! Hamsa! Being the auspicious vehicle of Goddess Saraswathi, you carry learning and art upon your shoulders. 
Give us that discriminating wisdom for which you are famous, such as your proverbial ability to separate the substance of milk from water”.

Swans are revered in Hinduism, and are compared to saintly persons whose chief characteristic is to be in the world without getting attached to it, just as a swan glides on water without getting its feathers wet. 
The Sanskrit word for swan is hamsa or hansa, and it is the vehicle of many deities like the goddess Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge, learning and art. 
It is mentioned several times in the Vedic literature, and persons who have attained great spiritual capabilities are sometimes called Paramahamsa (“Great Swan”) on account of their spiritual grace and ability to travel between various spiritual worlds. 
In the Vedas, swans are said to reside in the summer at the Manasarovar Lake near the Kailash Mountain and migrate to Indian lakes for the winter. In mythology, the bird is mute and believed to possess some powers such as the ability to eat pearls. 
They are also believed to be able to drink up the milk and leave the water from a saucer of milk adulterated with water.