Archive for monsoon

Le bassin aux nymphéas

Posted in Indian Numpheas with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2009 by designldg

Le bassin aux nymphéas

 

This is a new image which comes in the series of pictures that I have been working like the Water Lilies (or Nympheas) by French Impressionist Claude Monet (1840-1926). 

This game is coming from my imagination only where the impressionist painter could have been painting his series (about 250) of oil paintings not in Giverny but in India as I shot this in the beautiful and serene Lodhi Garden in Delhi.

It was before a storm at dusk so I also borrowed the title to Monet, “Le bassin aux nympheasr” (Water Lily Pond).

The Lodhis were a pashtun Muslim dynasty which ruled much of Northern India during the 16th century.

Advertisements

“Inexpressible is the story of Love”

Posted in Indian Numpheas with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2009 by designldg

"Inexpressible is the story of Love"

 

This is a poem from Kabīr (Hindi: कबीर, Punjabi(Gurmukhi): ਕਬੀਰ, Urdu: /Punjabi (Shahmukhi)کبير‎) (1398—1448) who was a mystic poet from Varanasi (Benaras) whose literature has greatly influenced the Bhakti as well as Sufi movements of India.

“Akath Kahani Prem Ki, Kutch Kahi Na Jaye
Goonge Keri Sarkara, Baithe Muskae”

“Inexpressible is the story of Love
It cannot be revealed by words
Like the dumb eating sweet-meat
Only smiles, the sweetness he cannot tell”

The hall mark of Kabir’s poetry is that he conveys in his two line poems (Doha), what others may not be able to do in many pages.

The rainy season is the time for lotus flowers and a few days ago I saw this lotus pond on the road from Khajuraho to the jungle which inspired Rudyard Kipling’s “Jungle book” in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
It was fun to work this image in the spirit of the French Impressionist Claude Monet’s Water Lilies (or Nympheas).

“Do not go to the garden of flowers!”

Posted in Indian Numpheas with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2009 by designldg

"Do not go to the garden of flowers!"

 

“bâgo nâ jâ re nâ jâ”

“Do not go to the garden of flowers!
O Friend! go not there;
In your body is the garden of flowers.
Take your seat on the thousand petals of the lotus, and there gaze on the Infinite Beauty.”

This is a poem from Kabīr (Hindi: कबीर, Punjabi(Gurmukhi): ਕਬੀਰ, Urdu: /Punjabi (Shahmukhi)کبير‎) (1398—1448) who was a mystic poet from Varanasi (Benaras) whose literature has greatly influenced the Bhakti as well as Sufi movements of India.
The hall mark of Kabir’s poetry is that he conveys in his two line poems (Doha), what others may not be able to do in many pages.

I am fascinated by lotus flowers that I like to connect to French Impressionist Claude Monet’s Water Lilies (or Nympheas).
Monsoon is the season for lotus and last June I took this picture at some relatives’ garden in Katni located in the state of Madhya Pradesh in central India.

Monsoon’s showers

Posted in Hinduism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2009 by designldg

Monsoon's showers

 

I took this picture last Sunday morning in Delhi, the rain was becoming very strong however there was a very long line of pilgrims in that street.
People were waiting in order to worship in a temple nearby and they were enjoying the first showers of the monsoon.

Monsoon is here, earliest in 108 years, a good two weeks ahead of the normal date in Delhi.
The city received 30.3 mm of rain on Sunday, the total rainfall till now in June has been 34.8 mm.
The rainfall brought down the heat by 11 degree Celsius (28.5°).
The monsoon is now advancing rapidly, covering the entire country.

Most of the people over here are happy, they find the monsoon season very romantic…

The sixth Mughal ruler’s print

Posted in In Search of Lost Time with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2009 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“The oldest city in the world”.

This is a view of Bhonsala Ghat in Varanasi (Benaras), it is shot from a boat on River Ganga.

The king Bhonsala from Nagpur made this ghat in 1780, later in 1795 Lakhsmi Narayana’s temple was also built there.

In the background stands Aurangzeb’s mosque.
Aurangzeb (Persian: اورنگ‌زیب), also known as Alamgir I (Persian: عالمگیر), (November 3, 1618 – March 3, 1707) was the ruler of the Mughal Empire from 1658 until his death.
He was the sixth Mughal ruler after Babur, Humayun, Akbar, Jahangir, and Shah Jahan.

Aurangzeb was notable for his piety and zeal.
Strict adherence to Islam and Sharia (Islamic law)—as he interpreted them—were the foundations of his reign.
He codified and instituted Sharia law throughout the empire, abandoning the religious tolerance of his predecessors.
It is a staple of traditional accounts of his reign that many Hindu temples were defaced and destroyed, and many non-Muslims converted to Islam.
The Jizya, a head tax on non-Muslims, was reinstated during his rule.
Aurangzeb ruled Hindustan for 48 years.
He expanded the Mughal Empire to its greatest extent, encompassing all but the southern tip of the Indian subcontinent.
His constant policies of war, however, left the empire dangerously overextended, isolated from its strong Rajput allies, and with a population that (except for the orthodox Sunni Muslim minority) expressed resentment, if not outright rebellion, to his reign.
He remains one of the most controversial figures in the history of the subcontinent.
His religious policies continue to inspire conflict between religious and political groups in India, Pakistan and elsewhere.
He is generally regarded as the last powerful Mughal ruler. His successors, the ‘Later Mughals’, lacked his strong hand and the Hindu Maratha Empire mostly replaced Mughal rule during the rest of the 18th century.

Join the photographer at https://www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

Along the Ganges

Posted in In Search of Lost Time with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2009 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“The oldset living city in the world”.
In Varanasi (Benaras), I am oftenly using boats in order to avoid the traffic whenever I need to go from one side of the city to another.
As my camera is always in my pocket I keep on shooting images…

Recently I have been reading those words from Jawaharlal Nehru written in his book Discovery of India:
“…The Ganges, above all is the river of India, which has held India’s heart captive and drawn uncounted millions to her banks since the dawn of history.
The story of the Ganges, from her source to the sea, from old times to new, is the story of India’s civilization and culture, of the rise and fall of empires, of great and proud cities, of adventures of man…”

Join the photographer athttps://www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

 

Le Temps retrouvé

Posted in In Search of Lost Time with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2009 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“In Search of Lost Time”

“The bonds between ourselves and another person exists only in our minds.
Memory as it grows fainter loosens them, and notwithstanding the illusion by which we want to be duped and which, out of love, friendship, politeness, deference, duty, we dupe other people, we exist alone.
Man is the creature who cannot escape from himself, who knows other people only in himself,

and when he asserts the contrary, he is lying.”
(from ” In Search of Lost Time” by Marcel Proust – French novelist, 1871-1922)This was shot during the monsoon when the waters are coming high on the ghats.
Those people were enjoying a Sunday afternoon on the bank of river Ganga.
It was remembering a part of my childhood when I was playing like this during summers.

Those pictures of the oldest living city in the world are maybe an answer to my “Search of Lost Time”.
Like the french writer Marcel Proust with his monumental work, “Search of Lost Time”(in French, “À la recherche du temps perdu”, also titled “Remembrance of Things Past” in its initial English translation), the role of memory is central.
Memory is the link which leads a picture to another but I should say involuntary memory, as Benaras is acting on me like the “episode of the madeleine” in Proust’s novel.
When I walk in the City of Lights, I am transported back to an earlier time by sensory experiences of memory, triggered by smells, sights, sounds, or touch.
I believe this is what happens to most of the visitors coming here and this is why this place is so special, so unique, this is the reason why whoever we are, whatever our culutre can be, we all find something which might be connected to the begining of History and which is deeply in our soul…

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography