Archive for Le Louvre

Some Secrets of Life

Posted in Dreaming a Museum with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2010 by designldg


© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Of all our games, love’s play is the only one which threatens to unsettle our soul, and is also the only one in which the player has to abandon himself to the body’s ecstasy.
…Nailed to the beloved body like a slave to a cross, I have learned some secrets of life which are now dimmed in my memory by the operation of that same law which ordained that the convalescent, once cured, ceases to understand the mysterious truths laid bare by illness, and that the prisoner, set free, forgets his torture, or the conqueror, his triumph passed, forgets his glory.”
(Quotes from “Memoirs of Hadrian” by French writer Marguerite Yourcenar)

Antinoüs (111–130) was a member of the entourage of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, to whom he was beloved.
Antinous was deified after his death.
This marble statue stands at Le Louvre museum it allowed me to try a Canon EOs 500D.

 

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Evaluating Human Existence

Posted in Dreaming a Museum with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2010 by designldg


© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Like everyone else I have at my disposal only three means of evaluating human existence: the study of self, which is the most difficult and most dangerous method, but also the most fruitful; the observation of our fellowmen, who usually arrange to hide secrets where none exist; and books, with the particular errors of perspective to which they inevitably give rise.”
(Quotes from “Memoirs of Hadrian” by French writer Marguerite Yourcenar)

This marble statue of Antinoüs stands at Le Louvre museum, it allowed me to try a Canon EOs 500D and to take a few pictures where there is no edition.
Memoirs of Hadrian (French: Mémoires d’Hadrien) is a novel by the French writer Marguerite Yourcenar about the life and death of Roman Emperor Hadrian.
The book was first published in France in French in 1951 as Mémoires d’Hadrien, and was an immediate success, meeting with enormous critical acclaim.
Antinous was born to a Greek family in Bithynion-Claudiopolis, in the Roman province of Bithynia in what is now north-west Turkey.
He joined the entourage of the Emperor when Hadrian passed through Bithynia in about 124, and soon became his beloved companion who accompanied him on his many journeys through the empire.
Although some have suggested the two might have had a romantic relationship, it is uncertain if this was true.
In October 130, according to Hadrian, “Antinous was drowned in the Nilus.”
It is not known whether his death was the result of accident, suicide, murder, or religious sacrifice.
After his death, the grief of the emperor knew no bounds, causing the most extravagant respect to be paid to his memory abd he decreed his deification.

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Lady of Athens

Posted in Dreaming a Museum with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2010 by designldg

“A day can press down all human things, and a day can raise them up.
But the gods embrace men of sense and abhor the evil.”
(Athena to Odysseus. Sophocles, Ajax 130)

This huge statue of Athena, known as the Pallas of Velletri, was found in Velletri in the eighteenth century.
It is a copy of a bronze effigy, now lost, known from Roman copies and fragments of antique casts, found in Baia, near Naples and attributed to Cresilas, a Cretan sculptor.
It has been on display in the Louvre since December 1803 where I took this picture.

The Photographic Fallacy

Posted in Fallacies of Ambiguity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2009 by designldg

The Photographic Fallacy

 

This is a fallacy of equivocation, I have been playing with this image, misleading your visual perception.

Here I am showing a close-up of a classical greek sculpture which is in Le Louvre museum in Paris.
It was fun to use colours in order to emphase this perfectly proportioned figure of the Hellenistic period.

This was the time when sculptors were using a combination of Contrapposto and “in the round” compositions (intended to be seen from multiple angles) creating more interesting and natural poses. 
The fundamental aim was to create fluidity within the pose by changing from the conventional parallels of the shoulders, hips and knees to sloping angles. 
These angles were much more comparable to the anatomy in real life, further emphasising naturalism and movement.

“In the waiting line”

Posted in Fallacies of Ambiguity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2009 by designldg

"In the waiting line"

 

“Do you believe
In what you see
Motionless wheel
Nothing is real
Wasting my time
In the waiting line
Do you believe in
What you see”
(Lyrics from “In The Waiting Line” by Zero 7)

With this image I am still playing with the viewer’s perception, is this a close-up of a Greek sculpture from Le Louvre museum in Paris or is this a picture of a pehlwan (Indian wrestler) taken in Varanasi (Benaras)?

Zero 7 sings “In The Waiting Line”:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jj6yXxVc21Y

“Beyond is Arachosia”

Posted in Fallacies of Ambiguity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2009 by designldg

"Beyond is Arachosia"

 

“Beyond is Arachosia. 
And the Parthians call this White India; there are the city of Biyt and the city of Pharsana and the city of Chorochoad and the city of Demetrias; then Alexandropolis, the metropolis of Arachosia; it is Greek, and by it flows the river Arachotus. 
As far as this place the land is under the rule of the Parthians.”
(“Parthians stations”, 1st century CE)

Those words are from Isidorus of Charax who described during the 1st century CE, “Alexandropolis, the metropolis of Arachosia”, which he said was still Greek at such a late time.
Alexandria in Arachosia was a city in ancient times that is now called Kandahar or Qandahar (Pashto: کندھار, Persian: قندهار) in Afghanistan. 
It was founded by Alexander the Great and it is believed that Kandahar bears Alexander’s name from the Arabic and Persian rendering of “Alexander”, which derives from Iskandariya for Alexandria.
In Hindi Alexander is called Sikander (सिकन्दर) because at that time people were hearing “al-eks-an-der” or “the Ksander”.

After the departure of Alexander the city became part of the Mauryan Empire. 
The Mauryan emperor Ashoka erected a pillar there with a bilingual inscription in Greek and Aramaic.
The Greco-Bactrian Kingdom occupied Kandahar after the Mauryans, but then lost the city to the Indo-Greek Kingdom.

Here again this image is a close-up of a sculpture of the Hellenistic period which is in Le Louvre museum (Paris) and I have been using colours in order to provide a fallacy of equivocation on what is human and what is not…

A parching fever

Posted in Fallacies of Ambiguity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2009 by designldg

A parching fever

 

“And O the pity of it! in a moment I looked and was lost, lost and smit i’ the heart; the colour went from my cheek; of that brave pageant I bethought me no more. 
How I got me home I know not; but this I know, a parching fever laid me waste and I was ten days and ten nights abed.”
(from IDYLLS 1 – 4 by THEOCRITUS)

THEOCRITUS was a Greek bucolic poet who flourished in Syracuse, Cos and Alexandria in the C3rd BC. His surviving work can mostly be found within an old compendium of 30 poems known as the “Idylls of Theocritus.

This image is a close-up of a classical greek sculpture of the Hellenistic period which is in Le Louvre museum in Paris.
I have been using colours in order to emphase the naturalism and movement and to provide a fallacy of equivocation.