Archive for kabir

Hope for Him

Posted in The Oldest Living City in the World with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 7, 2011 by designldg

Hope for Him

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“O friend! hope for Him whilst you live, know whilst you live, understand whilst you live: for in life deliverance abides.
If your bonds be not broken whilst living, what hope of deliverance in death?
It is but an empty dream, that the soul shall have union with Him because it has passed from the body:
If He is found now, He is found then,
If not, we do but go to dwell in the City of Death.
If you have union now, you shall have it hereafter.
Bathe in the truth, know the true Guru, have faith in the true Name!
Kabîr says: “It is the Spirit of the quest which helps; I am the slave of this Spirit of the quest.”
(“Hope for Him”, a poem by Kabīr – mystic poet and saint of India, 1440-1518)

This man was preparing chai (tea) at Kedar ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
He seemed to be happy, away and free from those things which usually make ordinary people endure pain and distress…

The Self Within

Posted in The Oldest Living City in the World with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 7, 2011 by designldg

The Self Within

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Having crossed the river,
where will you go, O friend ?

There’s no road to tread,
No traveler ahead,
Neither a beginning, nor an end.

There’s no water, no boat, no boatman, no cord;
No earth is there, no sky, no time, no bank, no ford.

You have forgotten the Self within,
Your search in the void will be in vain;
In a moment the life will ebb
And in this body you won’t remain.

Be ever conscious of this, O friend,
You’ve to immerse within your Self;
Kabir says, salvation you won’t then need,
For what you are, you would be indeed.”
(Kabīr – mystic poet and saint of India, 1440-1518)

A few days ago this timeless sadhu was enjoying the winter sun along the holy waters of the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras), not far from where Kabīr used to write his poetry.
Kabir was influenced by the prevailing religious mood of his times, such as old Brahmanic Hinduism, Hindu and Buddhist Tantrism, the teachings of Nath yogis and the personal devotionalism of South India mixed with the imageless God of Islam.
Eminent historians like R.C. Majumdar, P.N. Chopra, B.N. Puri and M.N. Das have held that Kabir is the first Indian saint to have harmonised Hinduism and Islam by preaching a universal path which both Hindus and Muslims could tread together.

“There’s a moon in my body”

Posted in Indian Numpheas with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2009 by designldg

"There's a moon in my body"

 

” There’s a moon in my body…
There’s a moon in my body, but I can’t see it!
A moon and a sun.
A drum never touched by hands, beating, and I can’t hear it! ”

This is a poem from Kabīr (Hindi: कबीर, Punjabi(Gurmukhi): ਕਬੀਰ, Urdu: /Punjabi (Shahmukhi)کبير‎) (1398—1448) who was a mystic poet from Varanasi (Benaras), the social and practical manifestation of his philosophy represented a synthesis of Hindu, and Muslim concepts. 
According to Kabir, all life is an interplay of two spiritual principles, one is the personal soul (Jivatma) and the other is God (Paramatma) and salvation is the process of bringing into union these two divine principles.

Kabir is a very important figure in Indian history. 
He is unusual in that he is spiritually significant to Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims alike. 
Kabir touches the soul, the conscience, the sense of awareness and the vitality of existence in a manner that is unequalled in both simplicity and style. 
Another beauty of Kabir’s poetry is that he picks up situations that surround our daily lives. 
Thus, even today, Kabir’s poetry is relevant and helpful in both social and spiritual context. 
Following Kabir means understanding one’s inner self, realizing oneself, accepting oneself as is, and becoming harmonious with one’s surroundings.

Kabir has written much poetry and song, all verses are recorded in Hindi. 
His lyrics are characterised by a free use of the vernacular, and is unfettered by the grammatical bonds of his day and it is this quality which has made his philosophy accessible to generations of Indians.

Monsoon season is the lotus season and last June I saw this lotus pond on a road from Khajuraho to the jungle which inspired Rudyard Kipling’s “Jungle book” in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
Lotus always remind me French Impressionist Claude Monet’s Water Lilies (or Nympheas).

“Inexpressible is the story of Love”

Posted in Indian Numpheas with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2009 by designldg

"Inexpressible is the story of Love"

 

This is a poem from Kabīr (Hindi: कबीर, Punjabi(Gurmukhi): ਕਬੀਰ, Urdu: /Punjabi (Shahmukhi)کبير‎) (1398—1448) who was a mystic poet from Varanasi (Benaras) whose literature has greatly influenced the Bhakti as well as Sufi movements of India.

“Akath Kahani Prem Ki, Kutch Kahi Na Jaye
Goonge Keri Sarkara, Baithe Muskae”

“Inexpressible is the story of Love
It cannot be revealed by words
Like the dumb eating sweet-meat
Only smiles, the sweetness he cannot tell”

The hall mark of Kabir’s poetry is that he conveys in his two line poems (Doha), what others may not be able to do in many pages.

The rainy season is the time for lotus flowers and a few days ago I saw this lotus pond on the road from Khajuraho to the jungle which inspired Rudyard Kipling’s “Jungle book” in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
It was fun to work this image in the spirit of the French Impressionist Claude Monet’s Water Lilies (or Nympheas).

“Do not go to the garden of flowers!”

Posted in Indian Numpheas with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2009 by designldg

"Do not go to the garden of flowers!"

 

“bâgo nâ jâ re nâ jâ”

“Do not go to the garden of flowers!
O Friend! go not there;
In your body is the garden of flowers.
Take your seat on the thousand petals of the lotus, and there gaze on the Infinite Beauty.”

This is a poem from Kabīr (Hindi: कबीर, Punjabi(Gurmukhi): ਕਬੀਰ, Urdu: /Punjabi (Shahmukhi)کبير‎) (1398—1448) who was a mystic poet from Varanasi (Benaras) whose literature has greatly influenced the Bhakti as well as Sufi movements of India.
The hall mark of Kabir’s poetry is that he conveys in his two line poems (Doha), what others may not be able to do in many pages.

I am fascinated by lotus flowers that I like to connect to French Impressionist Claude Monet’s Water Lilies (or Nympheas).
Monsoon is the season for lotus and last June I took this picture at some relatives’ garden in Katni located in the state of Madhya Pradesh in central India.

With the Shadow of Darkness

Posted in 3 - RED HALO with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 27, 2009 by designldg

With the Shadow of Darkness

 

“Hang up the swing of love today!
Hang the body and the mind between the arms of the beloved, in the ecstasy of love’s joy:
Bring the tearful streams of the rainy clouds to your eyes, and cover your heart with the shadow of darkness:
Bring your face nearer to his ear, and speak of the deepest longings of your heart.
Kabir says: `Listen to me brother! bring the vision of the Beloved in your heart.”
“Koi prem ki peng jhulaao re” (Poem by Kabir, translated by Rabindranath Tagore)

I took this portrait of Anand while I was taking a few pictures for our new catalogue.
It was shot at the upper terrace of our office in Varanasi (Benaras).
Throw in pure linen with embroidery “Akbar” (RED HALO – Summer 2009).