Archive for hills

Purification

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 5, 2011 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“We can often say that our own sufferings and all the catastrophes, unwanted situations, disasters, wars, failures and sicknesses that are happening in our world these days are a combination of different results of a lack of merit and wisdom.
Therefore the practice of intensive and skillful purification is very urgently needed.
Purification in the sense of cleaning our defilement and obscurations accumulated since beginningless time until today, which have come in the form of the ripening negative karmic results.
Of course, besides spiritual practice, we all must be actively stopping all the negative actions, confessing about our negative activities by body, speech and mind and vowing never to do them again.
Practically also we should be going out there to help all the beings, whenever we can when the circumstances arise.
This goes without saying.”
(His Holiness Jigme Pema Wangchen, the Twelfth Gyalwang Drukpa)

 

This picture was shot at the entrance of Sheh palace which is facing the Himalayan hills of the Tibetan Plateau in Ladakh.

 

 

Advertisements

“Prayers for Leh which has lost all contact”

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 11, 2010 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Sad news, there were hundreds of people killed in flash floods and thousand of houses washed away in Leh.
Over 500 people are still missing tonight (Sunday).
The cloudburst, flash floods and mudslides that hit Leh town around midnight on Friday washed away government offices, paramilitary camps and residential homes.
Among the worst hit are the Defence Institute of High Altitude Research (DIHAR), many local hotels and shops.
With road and air connectivity disrupted and phone lines down, Leh has been cut off from rest of the world since Thursday night.
The disruption in communication system has affected the rescue work undertaken by the Army as well as other paramilitary personnel.
Over 6,000 army men and troopers of the Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) are involved in the massive relief and rescue operation and are assisting the local administration.
Airtel whose network is still operating in Leh, has issued SIM cards to the local administration for setting up helplines.

I never thought that this could happen in such a place which was a piece of heaven.
The Indus River there, called Sênggê Zangbo, the “Lion River” in Tibetan, is so narrow that I keep on wondering how such a thing is possible…
All my prayers are going to the wonderful people of Leh, I have their smiles and happiness in mind forever…

www.dailymotion.com/video/xec0tk_leh-floods-omar-visits-h…
www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKbDX86klC4

This is a view of Leh, the capital of the Himalayan kingdom of Ladakh which is in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir.
It was shot from a terrace at Leh Palace, a former home of the royal family of Ladakh.
Leh is at an altitude of 3,524 meters (11,483 ft), it is spread over 45,110 sq. km, and comprises the main town and 12 adjacent villages..
For centuries it has been an important stopover on trade routes along the Indus Valley between Tibet to the east, Kashmir to the west and also between India and China.

The Good Shine from Afar

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 8, 2010 by designldg

The Valley of Stupas

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 13, 2009 by designldg

The Valley of Stupas

 

“You don’t need to visualize the Lama,
For he is inseparable from you;
You don’t need to remember anything,
For he is always in your heart.”
(from My Crazy Tale, An Autobiographical Poem by H.H. the XIIth Gyalwang Drukpa)

This valley of stupas is on the way to Stok palace, the current residence of the royal family of Ladakh.
This amazing Hiamalyan landscape is a poetry of nature following the Indus river through stony hills.

The Land of High Passes

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 10, 2009 by designldg

The Land of High Passes

 

This picture was shot after crossing the third-highest pass in the world, the Changla pass which is at 5,425 m (17,800 ft).
It is a historically important route for travellers journeying from Ladakh to Lhasa in Tibet.
This pass is at the border between India and China, on the Tibetan Plateau (Changthang plateau), where it is only possible to come from May to September because of the snow.

The Changthang Wildlife Sanctuary (or the Changthang Cold Desert Wildlife Sanctuary) varies from 14000 to 19000 feet, and the topography is formed of deep gorges and vast plateaus. 
There are around 11 lakes and 10 marshes, and the majestic River Indus dances through the sanctuary, dividing it into two parts.
This land of silence belongs to wild yaks, changthangi (pashmina goat), Kiang (Tibetan Wild Ass) and marmots among many other species.

Changthang means Northern Plateau in Tibetan and Ladakh means “land of high passes”.

The Legendary Pashmina Goat

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 10, 2009 by designldg

P1220214

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

This baby goat is a changthangi or a pashmina goat, a breed from Lakakhi Changthang raised for Cashmere wool, known as pashmina, the softest, most luxurious and the best wool in the world, once woven.
This goat survives in Ladakh at the altitude of 12000 feet where temperature drops below 40 degree centigrade and grows a thick warm fleece, a unique very thin short inner coat of hair which is the best insulation in the world and this is pashmina.
Pashmina fiber is 15 to 19 microns in diameter where as a human hair is 75 microns in diameter.
One Himalayan goat produce s 3 to 8 ounce s of pashmina per year.
The origin of Pashmina dates back to ancient civilizations and has been traced back to the times of Mahabharata.
Earlier in olden days this precious fabric was known as the “fiber for kings” and pashmina shawls found favor with emperors, kings, princes, rullers and nobles.
Kashmir was for centuries the only place the fiber could be woven into shawls, according to treaties that gave the Maharaja of Kashmir exclusive rights to Tibet’s pashmina supply.
The name comes from Pashmineh, made from “pashm” which means “wool” in Persian.
Several Buddhist monks whome I met in monasteries told me that they own a few animals on the Tibetan Plateau which allow them to keep a source of income.
I took this picture near the third-highest pass in the world, the Changla pass which is at 5,425 m (17,800 ft).

“And there was Light”

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2009 by designldg

"And there was Light"

 

“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. 
And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
And God said, Let there be light: and there was light”.
(Genesis, 1. 1)

This is a view of Pangong Tso (Tso: lake in Ladakhi) located in Ladakh, at the Chinese border, at a height of about 4,250 m (13,900 ft) in the Himalayan hills.