Archive for hand

Blessings of Love

Posted in Hands of Grace with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 18, 2012 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“A successful marriage is an edifice that must be rebuilt every day.”
(Andre Maurois – French author, 1885–1967)

This picture was shot along the holy waters of the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras) where a new-married couple was getting the blessings from the groom’s mother.
This ceremony happens the day after the wedding, early in the morning when the couple is coming to seek blessings from the Goddess Ganga.

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A Human Adventure

Posted in 3 - RED HALO with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 16, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“The tricky part of the human journey is to transform ourselves continually as our life directions change.”
(Donna L. Friess – American teacher & author)

“LIKE” our new Facebook page for RED HALO and join this amazing human adventure in Varanasi.
You just have to follow this link, www.facebook.com/redhalo.in
Then you will see the collections but also what happens behind the scenes and meet some members of our team…

RED HALO is a collection of household linen based in Benaras (Varanasi – India) providing work to people living with difficulties and education to children.

On this picture Jai Prakar is doing a Aari embroidery on a linen throw with our “Lodhi” design, following the design transfered with the lime plaster application.
His hands are moving according his inspiration and brings a particular touch to each piece, making it unique…

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The Most Magnificent Cloth

Posted in Poetry in Fabric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

‎”…They declared that they could make the most magnificent cloth that one could imagine; cloth of most beautiful colours and elaborate patterns.
Not only was the material so beautiful, but the clothes made from it had the special power of being invisible to everyone who was stupid or not fit for his post.
“What a splendid idea,” thought the Emperor.
“What useful clothes to have.
If I had such a suit of clothes I could know at once which of my people is stupid or unfit for his post.”
So the Emperor gave the swindlers large sums of money and the two weavers set up their looms in the palace…”
(From “The Emperor’s New Clothes” by Hans Christian Anderson)

This was shot in a little workshop located near the chowk in Varanasi (Benaras) where traditional embroideries have been handed down from father to son since the time of the Mughals when that kind of work flourished.
Nowadays men wear that kind of sherwani mostly for weddings and engagement ceremonies.
Entering in such a workshop is like releasing a voluptuous fragrance from the past from an old bottle of perfume, it is like opening a door to a dream of magnificence, the splendor of the Great Mughals….
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“…Un jour, arrivèrent deux escrocs qui affirmèrent être tisserands et être capables de pouvoir tisser la plus belle étoffe que l’on pût imaginer.
Non seulement les couleurs et le motif seraint exceptionnellement beaux, mais les vêtements qui en seraient confectionnés posséderaient l’étonnante propriété d’être invisibles aux yeux de ceux qui ne convenaient pas à leurs fonctions ou qui étaient simplement idiots.
“Ce serait des vêtements précieux”, se dit l’empereur. “Si j’en avais de pareils, je pourrais découvrir qui, de mes sujets, ne sied pas à ses fonctions et départager les intelligents des imbéciles !
Je dois sur le champ me faire tisser cette étoffe!”
Il donna aux deux escrocs une avance sur leur travail et ceux-ci se mirent à l’ouvrage…”
(“Les Habits neufs de l’Empereur” de Hans Christian Andersen)

Cette photo a été prise dans un petit atelier se situant dans le chowk de Varanasi (Benares) où les broderies traditionnelles se sont transmises de père en fils depuis l’époque des Moghols lorsque cet artisanat prospérait.
De nos jours les hommes portent ces sherwani essentiellement pour les cérémonies de mariage et de fiançailles.
Entrer dans un atelier comme celui-ci revient à libérer une fragrance voluptueuse venant du passé d’une vieille bouteille de parfum, c’est comme ouvrir la porte à un rêve d’opulence, la splendeur des grands Monghols….

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What Makes It So Fine

Posted in Poetry in Fabric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

“…Then the Emperor himself came with his noblest noblemen, and the swindlers each raised an arm as if they were holding something.
They said, “These are the trousers, here’s the coat, and this is the mantle,” naming each garment.
“All of them are as light as a spider web.
One would almost think he had nothing on, but that’s what makes them so fine…”
(From “The Emperor’s New Clothes” by Hans Christian Anderson)

 

This picture was shot at my tailor in Varanasi (Benaras) during the last fitting of my brother’s sherwani.
The fabric is a traditional brocade with a Jamawar pattern made of silk and wool from one of our workshops in the city.
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“Toute la Beauté de la Chose”

 

“…Tous les gens pouvaient se rendre compte du mal qu’ils se donnaient pour terminer les habits de l’empereur.
Les tisserands firent semblant d’enlever l’étoffe de sur le métier, coupèrent dans l’air avec de gros ciseaux, cousirent avec des aiguilles sans fils et dirent finalement:
“Voyez, les habits neufs de l’empereur sont à présent terminés !”
“Voyez, Majesté, voici le pantalon, voilà la veste, voilà le manteau!” et ainsi de suite.
“C’est aussi léger qu’une toile d’araignée; on croirait presque qu’on n’a rien sur le corps, mais c’est là toute la beauté de la chose!”…”
(“Les Habits neufs de l’Empereur” de Hans Christian Andersen)

 

Cette photo a été prise à Varanasi (Benares) chez mon tailleur pendant le dernier essayage de la sherwani de mon frère.
Le tissus est un brocard traditionnel avec un motif Jamawar en laine et soie provenant de l’un de nos ateliers de la ville.

 

 

Unseen Forces

Posted in Hinduism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2011 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“No ashes are lighter than those of incense, and few things burn out sooner.”
(Walter Savage Landor – English writer and poet, 1775-1864)

 

This Holy man was burning incense sticks, as a gesture to Agni, the God of Fire, while facing the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
For the sadhu the world is alive with unseen forces that must be continually propitiated with offerings and cleansing rituals.
Their sacred fireplaces, known as dhuni, perform the same function as incense, on a larger scale, which is to transform matter into aether.
Burning incense is thus a reminder, of the sacred power of fire to transform, and the ultimate journey of all physical matter towards spirit.
For most Indians, incense remains an important part of the daily puja ritual, which is a religious offering performed by all Hindus to their deities, especially during the beginning of a new venture, or to commemorate some special occasion.
The aspect of the ritual known as Dhupa involves the offering of incense before the picture of a deity, as a token of respect.

 

Indian incense-making involves a wide variety of ingredients.
In accordance with Ayurvedic principles, all the ingredients that go into incense-making are categorized into five classes:
1. Ether (fruits) – examples: Star anise
2. Water (stems and branches) – examples: Sandalwood, Aloeswood, Cedarwood, Cassia, Frankincense, Myrrh, Borneol
3. Earth (roots) – examples: Turmeric, Vetivert, Ginger, Costus root, Valerian, Indian Spikenard
4. Fire (flowers) – examples: Clove
5. Air (leaves) – examples: Patchouli

 

 

 

Frozen Time

Posted in Hands of Grace with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 7, 2011 by designldg

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

“Time is too slow for those who wait, too swift for those who fear, too long for those who grieve, too short for those who rejoice, but for those who love, time is eternity.”
(Henry Van Dyke – American Writer, Poet and Essayist, 1852-1933)

A young lady was standing along the holy waters of the Ganges at Dasaswamedh Ghat, in Varanasi (Benaras).
She was keeping the golden watch of her father while he was worshiping in the river.
It was after sunrise and the light was already bright.
I took several portraits of her but I thought that her hands holding that watch was showing more about who she was, I could feel all the tenderness and respect she had for the most important man of her young life.
I showed her those pictures and she smiled at me with modesty.
My camera allowed me to freeze this moment in time as if it was possible to stop time running…

 

The Passion Mysteries

Posted in Christianity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 26, 2010 by designldg

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the desert, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that those who believe in him may not perish, but may have life everlasting.” John 3:14
“And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all things to myself.” John 12:32

This is a close-up of Ligier Richier’s “Lamentation of Christ” which is in Church of St. Étienne located in Saint-Mihiel, in northeastern France.
Ligier Richier (c. 1500 – 1567) was a sixteenth-century French sculptor who might have been inspired by the Mystery plays which are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe.
Medieval mystery plays focused on the representation of Bible stories in churches as tableaux with accompanying antiphonal song.
They developed from the 10th to the 16th century, reaching the height of their popularity in the 15th century before being rendered obsolete by the rise of professional theatre.