Archive for gwalior

From the Soul of Souls

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 11, 2013 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“What can I do, Muslims? I do not know myself.
I am neither Christian nor Jew, neither Magian nor Muslim,
I am not from east or west, not from land or sea,
not from the shafts of nature nor from the spheres of the firmament,
not of the earth, not of water, not of air, not of fire.
I am not from the highest heaven, not from this world,
not from existence, not from being.
I am not from India, not from China, not from Bulgar, not from Saqsin,
not from the realm of the two Iraqs, not from the land of Khurasan.
I am not from the world, not from beyond,
not from heaven and not from hell.
I am not from Adam, not from Eve, not from paradise and not from Ridwan.
My place is placeless, my trace is traceless,
no body, no soul, I am from the soul of souls.
I have chased out duality, lived the two worlds as one.
One I seek, one I know, one I see, one I call.
He is the first, he is the last, he is the outer, he is the inner.
Beyond He and He is I know no other.
I am drunk from the cup of love, the two worlds have escaped me.
I have no concern but carouse and rapture.
If one day in my life I spend a moment without you
from that hour and that time I would repent my life.
If one day I am given a moment in solitude with you
I will trample the two worlds underfoot and dance forever.
O Sun of Tabriz, I am so tipsy here in this world,
I have no tale to tell but tipsiness and rapture.”
(Jalal ad-Dīn Muhammad Rumi – Persian poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic, 1207–1273)

This was shot before sunset at the tomb of Mohammad Ghaus in Gwalior in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
The light and shadows were playing through the jalis (latticed screen) in the galleries surrounding the Sufi saint mazaar (tomb).
The building, built in the late 16th century in the typical Mughal style, is enclosed on all sides by delicately carved lattices over which rises a large dome.
This place is a pilgrimage centre for both the Hindus and the Muslims and make this place of devotion is a symbol of brotherhood as this is where anyone can express his faith.

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Working with Atmosphere

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Technique undoubtedly helps make photography magical, but I prefer to work with atmosphere.
I think that the obsession with technique is a male thing.
Boy’s toys.
They love playing… but once you’ve perfected something you have to start searching for a new toy.
I would rather search for a new model or location.”
(Ellen von Unwerth – German photographer and director, b.1954)

This is a view of a side of Man Singh Palace, one of the most beautiful structures in the Gwalior Fort.
The fortress stands on an isolated rock, overlooking the Gwalior town, in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

Within its rich history Gwalior Fort occupies a unique place in the human civilization as the place which has the first ever recorded use of zero.

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The Beauty of the Morning

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Earth hath not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty:
This City now doth, like a garment, wear
The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,
Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first splendor, valley, rock, or hill;
Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! The very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!”
(“Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802” by William Wordsworth, 1770-1850)

This view of Gwalior was shot from a window of the Karna Mahal, the palace next to Man Singh Palace, which stands on an isolated rock overlooking the city in Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

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Imperfect Beauty

Posted in Timeless Black & White with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“There is desire in the perfect, beauty in the imperfect.
Thus I lust over the flawless,
and fall amorously forceless to the flawed.”
(From “Reminiscence of the Present: Spiritual Encounters of the Analytically Insane” by Ilyas Kassam)

North to Man Singh Palace, the magnificent and main palace in Gwalior Fort, lie a few ruined Mughal palaces.
This picture was shot inside the Karna Mahal which was the palace of the maternal uncle of the most famous Tomar Rajput kings of Gwalior State (today in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh).
The Karna Mahal was built in pure Hindu style during the 15th century.
It is a long two-storeyed building (200’x200′) with a large assembly hall and a bathing arrangement for women (hammam).

This is the fascinating kingdom of a world in decay where flows a unique beauty curiously flawed by time…
(With special regards to Ilyas Kassam for allowing me to use his poetry with my images)

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The Oilman’s Temple

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“If we want a love message to be heard, it has got to be sent out.
To keep a lamp burning, we have to keep putting oil in it.”
(Mother Teresa of Calcutta – Albanian born Indian Missionary. Nobel Prize for Peace in 1979. 1910-1997)

The Telikā Mandir or “oil-man’s temple” located in the complex of Gwalior fort, in Gwalior in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, was built in the late eighth century.
Elevating to the height of 100 feet ( about 30m), Teli Ka Mandir is the tallest temple in the confines of the Fort.
The building was erected just as the Gurjara Pratihāras were asserting their power over central India.
It is actually dedicated to Lord Vishnu in the form of his mount, Garuda and this unusual image makes the circlet of the doorway.
The structure of this Rajput temple presents a perfect fusion of the northern and southern architectural styles of India.
The ‘shikhar’ (spire) of the temple is undeniably Dravidian in its style, whereas the ornamentation is done in the Nagara style (specific to North India).
Unlike other temples, Oilman’s Temple doesn’t have any ‘mandap’ or pillared hall.
The temple comprises a sanctum sanctorum accompanied by a porch and a doorway imprinted with elaborate carvings (amorous couples, coiled serpents, gods and goddesses).
The weird and wonderful arrangement of two architectural styles show how Teli Ka Mandir boasts about the heritage and rich culture of India.

“Teli Ka Mandir” sounds as an unusual term, but it has several theories behind its name.
According to one of the legends, Rashtrakuta Govinda III seized the Gwalior Fort in 794.
He handled the service of religious ceremonies and rituals to Telang Brahmins and as a result of this, the temple acquired its name.
Another legend says that oil merchants or the men of Teli Caste took the initiative of temple’s construction and due to it, the temple got its name.
The third speculation reveals that name is linked with Telangana region of Andhra Pradesh.
This revelation also approves with the synthesis of Dravidian and North Indian architectural styles.

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Scattering Cheerful Beams

Posted in Daydreams & Reveries, Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“O Holy Spirit, descend plentifully into my heart.
Enlighten the dark corners of this neglected dwelling and scatter there Thy cheerful beams.”
(Saint Augustine – Ancient Roman Christian Theologian and Bishop of Hippo from 396 to 430. One of the Latin Fathers of the Church. 354-430)

This picture was shot before sunset inside the Small Sas Bahu temple in Gwalior located in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.It was initially dedicated to Lord Vishnu by the King Mahipala and was built in red sandstone during the 10th century.
Lord Vishnu is also known as Sahastrabahu, the one with many hands however gradually the name changed into Sas Bahu Temple, perhaps by mispronunciation, or misinterpretation.
Lord Vishnu is supposed to be the preserver of this Universe and keeps vigilance over this earth and if there is any disobedience among men, he punishes them.
But he is also considered to be the most kind hearted among the Hindu Avatars of God, who come to help his followers under any circumstances.
The construction of this temple was completed in the year 1092 AD by the king Mahipala who shed for the success of his Kingdom and the overall prosperity.

There are two temples, which are conjointly known as the Sas Bahu Temple.
One of the temples is bigger than the other, and perhaps for that reason, one is considered as the Mother-in Law whiles the other as the Daughter-in-Law.

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With Gratitude

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Reverence, humility, contentment, gratitude and hearing the good Dhamma, this is the best good luck”.
(Buddha – Hindu Prince Gautama Siddharta, the founder of Buddhism, 563-483 B.C.)

This is a view of the city of Gwalior located in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, it was shot from the Small Sas Bahu Ka Mandir (temple) built in red sandstone during the 10th century and dedicated to Lord Vishnu.

According to local tradition, Gwalior owes its name to a sage of former times.
Suraj Sen, a prince of the Kachhwaha clan of the eighth century, is said to have lost his way in the jungle.
On a secluded hill he met an old man, the sage Gwalipa, whose influence almost took him by surprise.
Upon asking the sage for some drinking water he was led to a pond; the waters not only quenched his thirst but cured him of leprosy.
Out of gratefulness, the prince wished to offer the sage something in return, and the sage asked him to build a wall on the hill in order to protect the other sages from wild animals which often disturbed their yagnas (or pujas).
Suraj Sen later built a palace inside the fort, which had been named “Gwalior” after the sage who had given him the gift of a new life; the city which grew around the fort took the same name.
The city became, over the centuries, the cradle of great dynasties and with each, the city gained new dimensions from the warrior-kings, poets, musicians and saints who contributed to making it a capital renowned throughout the country.

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