Archive for God

The Passion Mysteries

Posted in Christianity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 26, 2010 by designldg

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“And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the desert, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that those who believe in him may not perish, but may have life everlasting.” John 3:14
“And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all things to myself.” John 12:32

This is a close-up of Ligier Richier’s “Lamentation of Christ” which is in Church of St. Étienne located in Saint-Mihiel, in northeastern France.
Ligier Richier (c. 1500 – 1567) was a sixteenth-century French sculptor who might have been inspired by the Mystery plays which are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe.
Medieval mystery plays focused on the representation of Bible stories in churches as tableaux with accompanying antiphonal song.
They developed from the 10th to the 16th century, reaching the height of their popularity in the 15th century before being rendered obsolete by the rise of professional theatre.

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The Symbol of the Cross

Posted in Christianity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 26, 2010 by designldg

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

History shows that the cross was used centuries before Christ.
“From its simplicity of form, the cross has been used both as a religious symbol and as an ornament, from the dawn of man’s civilization.
Various objects, dating from periods long anterior to the Christian era, have been found, marked with crosses of different designs, in almost every part of the old world.
India, Syria, Persia and Egypt have all yielded numberless examples, while numerous instances, dating from the later Stone Age to Christian times, have been found in nearly every part of Europe.
The use of the cross as a religious symbol in pre-Christian times, and among non-Christian peoples, may probably be regarded as almost universal, and in very many cases it was connected with some form of nature worship”.
(The Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th ed., 1910, Vol. 7, pg. 506. Emphasis ours.)

The surprising thing is that the Christian use of the cross did not begin until the time of Constantine, three centuries after Christ.
Archaeologists have not found any Christian use of the symbol before that time.
According to one writer (W. E. Vine, Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words, article “Cross”), the cross as a “Christian” symbol was taken directly from the pagans.

The New Testament does not specifically describe the instrument upon which Christ died, though Acts 5:30; 10:39; and 13:28-29 refer to it as a “tree.”
The Greek word xulon, translated “tree” in these verses, can mean a stick, club, tree, stake, or other wooden articles.
There is absolutely no evidence that God’s true church ever used the cross symbol for any purpose.
Nowhere does the Bible command its use however, throughout the world, people universally regard the cross as THE symbol of Christianity.
Among Christians it recalls the crucifixion of Jesus and humanity’s redemption thereby.
The Christian form of blessing by tracing a cross over oneself or another person or thing.

This cross is the reflection of a light on a wall in the Église de Saint-Eustache which is a church in the Ier arrondissement of Paris, built between 1532 and 1632.
It was shot during the midnight Mass celebrated on Christmas Eve.

Avatāra (अवतार)

Posted in Dreaming a Museum, Hinduism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 8, 2010 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Do you know who ‘god’ is?
God is not Vishnu or Shiva or Brahma; not the wind, the sun nor the moon; nor the brahmana or the king; not I or you; not Lakshmi or the mind.
God is without form and undivided (not in the objects); that splendor which is not made and which has neither beginning nor end is known as god, or Lord Shiva, which is pure consciousness.
That alone is fit to be worshipped; that alone is all.”
(Sage Vasishtha – Mānasaputra (“mind son”) of Brahma)

This sculture stands on the building’s wall of the little museum which is at the entrance of the Sampurnanand Sanskrit University in Varanasi (Benaras).
It was sculpted during the the golden age period most probably in the second century A.D.
Apparently this avatar of God should be Lord Shiva even though he is not wearing any rudraksh.
The animal represented as the vehicule seems to be Nandi, the bull which Shiva rides and the gate keeper of Shiva and Parvati in Hindu mythology.

“Hallelujah is Our Song”

Posted in Hinduism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2010 by designldg

“Do not abandon yourselves to despair.
We are the Easter people and hallelujah is our song.”
(Pope John Paul II, 1920 – 2005)

This Bell, known in Sanskrit as Ghanti is in a Shiva temple facing the Ganges on the way to Gai Ghat in Varanasi (Benaras).
It is used in all poojas for invoking God, producing the auspicious sound “Om”, the universal name of the Lord.
“Agamaarthamtu devaanaam Gamanaarthamtu rakshasaam Kurve ghantaaravam tatra Devataahvaahna lakshanam, 
(I ring this bell indicating the invocation of divinity, So that virtuous and noble forces enter (my home and heart); And the demonic and evil forces from within and without, depart)”. 

In some Christian countries, the ringing of the church bells on every day of the week of Easter represents the announcement of the new life spring brings and also frightens off the spirits of darkness and evil.
Easter is the central religious feast in the Christian liturgical year.
According to Christian scripture, Jesus was resurrected from the dead on the third day after his crucifixion.

Happy easter to all of you.

The Art of Seeing

Posted in Mobilis in Mobile with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 12, 2010 by designldg

“When a man understands the art of seeing, he can trace the spirit of an age and the features of a king even in the knocker on a door.”
(“The Hunchback of Notre-Dame”, a novel by Victor Hugo published in 1831)

In The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Victor Hugo makes frequent reference to the architecture of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris.
The enormous popularity of the book in France spurred the nascent historical preservation movement in that country and strongly encouraged Gothic revival architecture.
Ultimately it led to major renovations at Notre-Dame in the 19th century led by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc.
Much of the cathedral’s present appearance is a result of this renovation.

I don’t show many images of Paris in my photostream however there is a connection with a series of pictures about Gothicism in Varanasi (Benaras) on which I am working actuallyand that I’ll be uploading soon.

“God has no religion”

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 9, 2009 by designldg

"God has no religion"

 

“God has no religion”
(Mahatma Gandhi, 1869-1948)

Those words by Gandhiji take their plain meaning when I have the chance to be among so many religions which are so different and yet so close…
I took this picture of Shiva temples roofs as I was stepping down the narrow staircase which leads to Ahilyabai ghat which is along the holy waters of the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).

“A world of his own”

Posted in Corporeality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 13, 2009 by designldg

"A world of his own"

 

“All men whilst they are awake are in one common world: but each of them, when he is asleep, is in a world of his own”. 
(Plutarch)

This is one more picture that I took while going down the stairs leading to the Ganges at Gai ghat in Varanasi (Benaras) but this one was shot four weeks later.
However the same man is sleeping at the same place, he is wearing the same T-shirt and the same necklace and maybe this is also the same fly which is sleeping with him as anything occurs in the oldest living city in the world…