Archive for foot

Unrelenting Abandon

Posted in Corporeality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

Unrelenting Abandon

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“The pain is unrelenting; one does not abandon, even briefly, one’s bed of nails, but is attached to it wherever one goes.”
(William Styron – American Writer and Novelist, 1925-2006)

This was shot along the Ganges at Venimadhava ghat in Varanasi (Benaras) on a Sunday morning.
This man was having a traditional ayurvedic foot massage and he was in a state of unrelenting abandon…
Ayurveda is an ancient system of medicine that was developed in the Indian subcontinent hundreds of years ago.
According to the principle of Ayurveda, the human body is composed of a unique mixture of energies, called ‘dosha’.
This unique mixture differs from person to person.
person’s ‘dosha’ determines the kind of lifestyle that that person should lead, the ailments he or she will be susceptible to, the sort of food to be partaken, etc.
Thus Ayurveda bases treatment based on a person’s unique ‘dosha’.

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Strings of Tension

Posted in Jai Jagdish Hare with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2011 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

“The world is all gates, all opportunities, strings of tension waiting to be struck.”
(Ralph Waldo Emerson – American Poet and Essayist, 1803-1882)

This is a close-up of the foot of a Sanskrit university student, trained to become a Hindu priest, while he was performing a religious ritual ceremony in order to worship the elements at Dasaswamedh ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
At that time he was manipulating a heavy “Aarti lamp” making a tension on his foot while he had to twist his body in clockwise manner.
Marigold petals were spread all around the platform.

The Passion Mysteries

Posted in Christianity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 26, 2010 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the desert, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that those who believe in him may not perish, but may have life everlasting.” John 3:14
“And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all things to myself.” John 12:32

This is a close-up of Ligier Richier’s “Lamentation of Christ” which is in Church of St. Étienne located in Saint-Mihiel, in northeastern France.
Ligier Richier (c. 1500 – 1567) was a sixteenth-century French sculptor who might have been inspired by the Mystery plays which are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe.
Medieval mystery plays focused on the representation of Bible stories in churches as tableaux with accompanying antiphonal song.
They developed from the 10th to the 16th century, reaching the height of their popularity in the 15th century before being rendered obsolete by the rise of professional theatre.

Removing a Splinter

Posted in Wings of the Soul with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 11, 2009 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Understanding suffering is very important.
The practice of meditation is designed not to develop pleasure but to understand the truth of suffering; and in order to understand the truth of suffering, one also has to understand the truth of awareness.
When true awareness takes place, suffering does not exist. Through awareness, suffering is somewhat changed in its perspective.
It is not necessarily that you do not suffer, but the haunting quality that fundamentally you are in trouble is removed.
It is like removing a splinter.
It might
hurt, and you might still feel pain, but the basic cause of that pain, the ego, has been removed.”

“Removing the splinter of ego” from Chapter Three, “The Power of Flickering Thoughts,” in “the truth of suffering and the path of liberation”, based on talks at the Vajradhatu Seminaries conducted by Chogyam Trungpa.

This young man was removing a splinter from his foot as he was sitting along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
He reminded me a Greek sculpture from the Hellenistic department which is in Le Louvre museum in Paris.

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I seek refuge at Thy feet

Posted in Jai Jagdish Hare with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 26, 2009 by designldg

I seek refuge at Thy feet

 

“…Dīna bandhu dukha harata
Ṭhākura tuma mere
Swāmi ṭhākura tuma mere
Apane hāth uṭhao
Apani sharaṇi lagāo
Dwāra paḍā hūn tere
Om jaya Jagadiśa hare…”

“…Friend of the helpless and feeble
Benevolent saviour of all
Lord, benevolent saviour of all
Offer me Thy hand of compassion
Protect me and bless me,
I seek refuge at Thy feet
Oh Lord of the Universe…”
(Part 7 from “Om Jai Jagdish Hare”, the most popular of the Hindu aartis)

This picture was shot during the daily Ganga Aarti at Dasaswamedh ghat.
It is performed by students from the Sanskrit University who will become Hindu priests.

Beyond Orientalism

Posted in Hinduism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2009 by designldg

 

Beyond Orientalism

 

“The oldest living city in the world”.

I went early this morning for a walk in Kashi, the old part of Varanasi (Benaras) in order to take a few pictures.
Near Kashi Vishwanath temple (Lord Shiva’s mandir) those two young Brahmans were talking seriously, they saw me taking pictures and didn’t really care of it.

The attitude of the boy standing on the right reminds of Lord Krishna who is oftened depicted in this position.
I found a touch of Orientalism in the composition that I could see in my camera screen, something which reminded me French paintings of the 19°.

Those two kids belong to the Brahman cast (aslo known as Brahmin) which according Hinduism, refers to the priestly caste in the Hindu caste system. 
The Sanskrit word Brāhmaṇa denotes the scholar/teacher, priest, caste, class (varṇa), or tribe, that has been traditionally enjoined to live a life of learning, teaching and non-possessiveness.