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Peace and Harmony

Posted in Islam, The Oldest Living City in the World with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“May the spirit of Ramadan illuminate the world and show us the way to peace and harmony.”

Today starts Ramzan (Ramadan) in India.
It is the Islamic month of fasting, in which participating Muslims refrain from eating, drinking and sexual activities from dawn until sunset.
Fasting is intended to teach Muslims about patience, humility and spirituality and is a time to fast for the sake of God (Allah) and to offer more prayer than usual.
During Ramadan, Muslims ask forgiveness for past sins, pray for guidance and help in refraining from everyday evils, and try to purify themselves through self-restraint and good deeds.
Ramadan was the month in which the first verses of the Qur’an were revealed to the Islamic Prophet Muhammad.

The name “Ramadan” had been the name of the ninth month in Arabian culture long before the arrival of Islam; the word itself derived from an Arabic root rmḍ, as in words like “ramiḍa” or “ar-ramaḍ” denoting intense heat, scorched ground and shortness of rations.
In the Qu’ran, God proclaims that “fasting has been written down (as obligatory) upon you, as it was upon those before you”.
According to the earliest hadith, this refers to the Jewish practice of fasting on Yom Kippur.

This is a view of Aurangzeb mosque, also known as the Alamgir Mosque or as Beni Madhav Ka Darera, which is dominating Panchganga Ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
This square stone building covered with three domes was originally established by Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb and features a fine combination of Hindu and Mughal art and architecture and indicates the rich artworks of ancient India.
It was built on the site of the Vishnu Temple, the Temple of Bindu Madhava and now reflects the Ganga-Jamuni tehzeeb culture, a smooth coexistence of the Hindu and the Muslim religions.
The mosque overlooks Panchganga Ghat which is considered to be a sacred bathing place and its lower part still features a Hindu temple.

Ramzan Mubarak to Everyone…

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Flags of Truth

Posted in The Oldest Living City in the World with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“No doubt Pain as God’s megaphone is a terrible instrument: it may lead to final and unrepented rebellion.
But it gives the only opportunity the bad man can have for amendment.
It removes the veil; it plants the flag of truth within the fortress of a rebel soul.”
(C.S. Lewis – British Scholar and Novelist, 1898-1963)

This lady was rowing a boat towards Munsi ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
It was before sunset, she was carrying candles with flowers to sell to the devoteees who were already gathering along the river in order to perform the evening puja.
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“La souffrance, en tant que porte-voix de Dieu, est un terrible instrument; il peut conduire à la rébellion finale et impénitente.
Mais il représente, pour tous les méchants, l’unique occasion de s’amender.
Il ôte le voile; il plante le drapeau de la vérité dans la forteresse même de l’âme rebelle.”
(C.S. Lewis – Ecrivain et universitaire irlandais, 1898-1963)

Cette femme ramait une barque en direction de Munsi ghat au bord du Gange à Varanasi (Benares).
C’était avant le coucher du soleil, elle amenait des bougies avec des fleurs afin de les vendre aux dévôts qui commençaient à se rassemblaient le long du fleuve pour accomplir le puja du soir.

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Merit and Wisdom

Posted in Ladakh, the "land of high passes" with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 5, 2011 by designldg

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“In order for us to progress smoothly and swiftly on our spiritual path, we need the help of two things – merit and wisdom – they are like the 2 wings of a bird, lacking one will cripple our progress.
We need to accumulate merit and wisdom with joyful effort and enthusiasm.
Merit without wisdom or wisdom without merit will not help.”
(His Holiness Jigme Pema Wangchen, the Twelfth Gyalwang Drukpa)

This is the main door of the ancient palace in Leh, the capital of Ladakh in the Himalayan hills.
It was shot at sunset.
This palace was modelled on the Potala Palace in Lhasa (Tibet) and is the highest building in the world of his own times.
Leh has for centuries been an important stopover on trade routes along the Indus Valley between Tibet to the east, Kashmir to the west and also between India and China.
The main goods carried were salt, grain, pashm or cashmere wool, charas (cannabis resin) from the Tarim Basin, indigo, silk yarn and Banaras brocades.

Scattering Cheerful Beams

Posted in Daydreams & Reveries, Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“O Holy Spirit, descend plentifully into my heart.
Enlighten the dark corners of this neglected dwelling and scatter there Thy cheerful beams.”
(Saint Augustine – Ancient Roman Christian Theologian and Bishop of Hippo from 396 to 430. One of the Latin Fathers of the Church. 354-430)

This picture was shot before sunset inside the Small Sas Bahu temple in Gwalior located in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.It was initially dedicated to Lord Vishnu by the King Mahipala and was built in red sandstone during the 10th century.
Lord Vishnu is also known as Sahastrabahu, the one with many hands however gradually the name changed into Sas Bahu Temple, perhaps by mispronunciation, or misinterpretation.
Lord Vishnu is supposed to be the preserver of this Universe and keeps vigilance over this earth and if there is any disobedience among men, he punishes them.
But he is also considered to be the most kind hearted among the Hindu Avatars of God, who come to help his followers under any circumstances.
The construction of this temple was completed in the year 1092 AD by the king Mahipala who shed for the success of his Kingdom and the overall prosperity.

There are two temples, which are conjointly known as the Sas Bahu Temple.
One of the temples is bigger than the other, and perhaps for that reason, one is considered as the Mother-in Law whiles the other as the Daughter-in-Law.

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Endless Time

Posted in Dreams in Disorder with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Time is endless in thy hands, my lord.
There is none to count thy minutes.

Days and nights pass and ages bloom and fade like flowers.
Thou knowest how to wait.

Thy centuries follow each other perfecting a small wild flower.

We have no time to lose,
and having no time we must scramble for a chance.
We are too poor to be late.

And thus it is that time goes by
while I give it to every querulous man who claims it,
and thine altar is empty of all offerings to the last.

At the end of the day I hasten in fear lest thy gate be shut;
but I find that yet there is time. ”
(“Endless Time” by Rabindranath Tagore- Indian Poet, Playwright and Essayist, Won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, 1861–1941)

This is a window of the Jahangiri Mahal in Orchha which is located in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

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So Many Tomorrows

Posted in The Oldest Living City in the World with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Somebody should tell us, right at the start of our lives, that we are dying.
Then we might live life to the limit, every minute of every day.
Do it! I say. Whatever you want to do, do it now!
There are only so many tomorrows.”
(Pope Paul VI, born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini. 1897-1978)

This is a view of Manikarnika Ghat (मणिकर्णिका घाट) shot from a boat on the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
This is the place where one comes face to face with life and death.
Manikarnika Ghat symbolizes mortality of the world and is one of the oldest and most sacred Ghats in Benaras.
According to the Hindu mythology, being burned here provides an instant gateway to liberation from the cycle of births and rebirths.
It is lying at the center of the five tirthas which are representing both creation and destruction.
there the mortal remains are consigned to flames with the prayers that the souls rest in eternal peace.
This place is also called “the great cremation ground” (Mahasmasana), this is where Lord Siva gives Taraka mantra ( “Prayer of the crossing”) in the ear of the dead.
The name Manikarnika derives its origin from the dropping rings of Siva during His transcendental dance here.
The historical sources mention this site in the Gupta inscriptions of C.E.4th century.

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Mad Chess Players

Posted in Mobilis in Mobile with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2011 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Poets do not go mad; but chess-players do.
Mathematicians go mad, and cashiers; but creative artists very seldom.
I am not, as will be seen, in any sense attacking logic: I only say that this danger does lie in logic, not in imagination.”
(Gilbert Keith Chesterton – English writer, 1874 – 1936)

This was just a dream which happened over the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
Mirza Sajjad Ali and Mir Roshan Ali, two chess-obsessed men, used to meet everyday to indulge in their passion of the game, then little by little they became totally indifferent to the turmoil that surrounds them.
One day the Rumi Darwaza, also known as the Turkish Gate in Lucknow, tore from the ground and flew in the air.
It became a spectacular vessel which started a long journey over the Kingdom of Avadh.
Dreams are not meant to be real, with no doubt this one must have been inspired by “Shatranj Ke Khiladi” (The Chess Players) by Satyajit Ray…

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