Archive for chikan

Being a Woman

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 2, 2010 by designldg

Being a Woman

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“Being a woman is a terribly difficult task, since it consists principally in dealing with men.”
(Joseph Conrad – English novelist, 1857-1924)

Those ladies were working on traditional Chikan embroidery in their little village nearby Lucknow, the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
They were expecting me and they were wearing their nicest sarees with a few jewels and some heavy make-up.
When I came inside the house one protected her face with a part of cloth in order to cover her shyness while the other was openly showing her beauty.
I was touched by their attitude and the way they behaved according their personality
When I came to this village I thought that I would only take pictures of this amazing artcraft and I didn’t know then that I’ll make many portraits of the ladies and children living there.
They had so much to offer to my camera…

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Focusing on Chikan Embroidery

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 2, 2010 by designldg

Chikan Embroidery on Focus

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work at hand.
The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.”
(Alexander Graham Bell – Scottish born American Inventor and Educator, best known for the invention of the telephone in 1876. 1847-1922)

This lady lives in a little village nearby Lucknow, the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, where she is making traditional Chikan embroidery.
Chikan embroidery works are displayed in many distinguish styles on different attires.

Wrapped up in Shyness

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 2, 2010 by designldg

Wrapped up in Shyness

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“The way you overcome shyness is to become so wrapped up in something that you forget to be afraid”. (Claudia Lady Bird Johnson – First Lady of the United States, wife of Lyndon B. Johnson), 1912-2007) This lady is working on a traditional Chikan embroidery. She knew that I was coming in order to take a few pictures in her little village which is nearby Lucknow, the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, so she decided to wear her nicest sari and some heavy make-up. However when I came inside her house she was very shy and she covered her face with a part of the sari. I could still guess her features through the printed silk. Her attitude was touching, I only saw her face later when she wanted to see how came the pictures on the screen of my camera.

The Call of the Real

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2010 by designldg

The Call of the Real

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“What is Art? It is the response of man’s creative soul to the call of the Real.” (Rabindranath Tagore – Indian Poet, Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, 1861-1941) This young woman is making a traditional Chikan embroidery (chikankari चिकनकारी چکن کاری) in her little village located nearby Lucknow. Creation of a chikan work piece begins with the use of one or more pattern blocks that are used to block-print a pattern on the ground fabric. The embroiderer then stitches the pattern, and the finished piece is carefully washed to remove all traces of the printed pattern. The patterns and effects created depend on the types of stitches and the thicknesses of the threads used in the embroidery. Some of the varieties of stitches used include backstitch, chain stitch and hemstitch. The result is an open work pattern, jali (lace) or shadow-work. Often the embroiderer creates mesh-like sections in the design by using a needle to separate threads in the ground fabric, and then working around the spaces.

Chikankari Like Life

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2010 by designldg

IMG_5597 © All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern; it will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that; one stitch at a time taken patiently, and the pattern will come out all right, like embroidery.” (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. – American poet, physician and essayist, 1809 –1894) This young woman is making a Chikan embroidery (chikankari चिकनकारी چکن کاری) in her village which is nearby Lucknow. This popular artcraft is believed to have been intoduced by Nur Jehan who was the Mughal emperor Jahangir’s wife. The Nawab Shujaudaula of Avadh was greatly attracted by this craft and it was his keen initiative and interest, which promoted this craft in present day Lucknow. During the sixteenth century the Bengali migrants, influenced by the Portuguese traders, who came from Dacca in eighteenth century to settle in Lucknow brought this art of surface ornamentation and Chikan work came into production by the nineteenth century.

Glory and Perfection

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2010 by designldg

Glory and Perfection

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“I slept and dreamt that life was joy.
I awoke and saw that life was service.
I acted and behold, service was joy.”
(Rabindranath Tagore – Indian Poet, Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, 1861-1941)

This is a close-up of a Chikan embroidery done by a lady in a little village near Lucknow.
Chikan has a timeless grace and elegance and allows you to wear a piece of history as it is a form of embroidery that has been art part of India for centuries.
The legend says that it has been originally introduced by Nur Jahan, the beautiful wife of the Mughal emperor, Jahangir.
It has since evolved and attained its glory and perfection in Lucknow.
Chikan Embroidery is a form of hand embroidery with patterns of different designs stitched using untwisted white cotton or silk (or rayon) threads on the surface of the fabric.
In Chikan work, there is a fixed repertoire of stitches and it is usual for several types of stitched to appear on the same piece of embroidery (thereby enhancing it’s intricacy and beauty).

Dwell in Possibility

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2010 by designldg

Dwell in Possibility

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“I dwell in possibility
A fairer House than Prose
More numerous of Windows
Superior—for Doors.

Of Chambers as the Cedars
Impregnable of Eye
And for an Everlasting Roof
The Gambrels of the Sky.

Of Visitors—the fairest
For Occupation—This
The spreading wide of narrow Hands
To gather Paradise.”
(Emily Dickinson – American poet, 1830 –1886)

This is a close-up of a traditional Chikan embroidery made by a woman in a little village nearby Lucknow.