Archive for brocade

The Balancing Color

Posted in 3 - RED HALO, Poetry in Fabric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 28, 2012 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“The color of the object illuminated partakes of the color of that which illuminates it.”
(Leonardo da Vinci – Italian Renaissance polymath, 1452–1519)

This blueish tone of light green is called turquoise, the name comes from the French for Turkish.
This friendly and happy color is worn by many people in India.
In color psychology, this shade controls and heals the emotions creating emotional balance and stability.
It is a combination of blue and a small amount of yellow and it fits in on the color scale between green and blue.
It radiates the peace, calm and tranquility of blue and the balance and growth of green with the uplifting energy of yellow.
Turquoise recharges our spirits during times of mental stress and tiredness, alleviating feelings of loneliness.
Focussing on the color whether on a wall or clothing allows to feel instant calm and gentle invigoration, ready to face the world again…
Being the mid color between the extremes of red and violet, it is the color of balance, for the emotions, thoughts and speech.
Turquoise is calming yet invigorating, restoring depleted energies, it enhances the ability to focus and concentrate, assisting with clear thinking and decision-making, and the development of good organizational skills.
This shade also represents open communication from and between the heart and the spoken word.
It relates to the electronic age and the world of computers, and communication on a large scale.

This picture was shot in a little workshop in Varanasi (Benaras) held by a Muslim family who manufactures several fabrics for Red Halo.
Those turquoise threads are used in order to weave a traditional silk brocade on a handloom machine.
This traditional artcraft transmitted from generation to generation contributed to the fame of the oldest living city in the world.RED HALO is a collection of household linen based in Benaras (Varanasi – India) providing work to people who were living with difficulties and education to children.

“Like” the RED HALO page on Facebook and join this amazing human adventure in Varanasi,www.facebook.com/redhalo.in

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The Most Magnificent Cloth

Posted in Poetry in Fabric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

‎”…They declared that they could make the most magnificent cloth that one could imagine; cloth of most beautiful colours and elaborate patterns.
Not only was the material so beautiful, but the clothes made from it had the special power of being invisible to everyone who was stupid or not fit for his post.
“What a splendid idea,” thought the Emperor.
“What useful clothes to have.
If I had such a suit of clothes I could know at once which of my people is stupid or unfit for his post.”
So the Emperor gave the swindlers large sums of money and the two weavers set up their looms in the palace…”
(From “The Emperor’s New Clothes” by Hans Christian Anderson)

This was shot in a little workshop located near the chowk in Varanasi (Benaras) where traditional embroideries have been handed down from father to son since the time of the Mughals when that kind of work flourished.
Nowadays men wear that kind of sherwani mostly for weddings and engagement ceremonies.
Entering in such a workshop is like releasing a voluptuous fragrance from the past from an old bottle of perfume, it is like opening a door to a dream of magnificence, the splendor of the Great Mughals….
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“…Un jour, arrivèrent deux escrocs qui affirmèrent être tisserands et être capables de pouvoir tisser la plus belle étoffe que l’on pût imaginer.
Non seulement les couleurs et le motif seraint exceptionnellement beaux, mais les vêtements qui en seraient confectionnés posséderaient l’étonnante propriété d’être invisibles aux yeux de ceux qui ne convenaient pas à leurs fonctions ou qui étaient simplement idiots.
“Ce serait des vêtements précieux”, se dit l’empereur. “Si j’en avais de pareils, je pourrais découvrir qui, de mes sujets, ne sied pas à ses fonctions et départager les intelligents des imbéciles !
Je dois sur le champ me faire tisser cette étoffe!”
Il donna aux deux escrocs une avance sur leur travail et ceux-ci se mirent à l’ouvrage…”
(“Les Habits neufs de l’Empereur” de Hans Christian Andersen)

Cette photo a été prise dans un petit atelier se situant dans le chowk de Varanasi (Benares) où les broderies traditionnelles se sont transmises de père en fils depuis l’époque des Moghols lorsque cet artisanat prospérait.
De nos jours les hommes portent ces sherwani essentiellement pour les cérémonies de mariage et de fiançailles.
Entrer dans un atelier comme celui-ci revient à libérer une fragrance voluptueuse venant du passé d’une vieille bouteille de parfum, c’est comme ouvrir la porte à un rêve d’opulence, la splendeur des grands Monghols….

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The Emperor’s New Clothes

Posted in Poetry in Fabric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“MANY, many years ago lived an emperor, who thought so much of new clothes that he spent all his money in order to obtain them; his only ambition was to be always well dressed.
He did not care for his soldiers, and the theatre did not amuse him; the only thing, in fact, he thought anything of was to drive out and show a new suit of clothes.
He had a coat for every hour of the day; and as one would say of a king “He is in his cabinet,” so one could say of him, “The emperor is in his dressing-room…”
(From “The Emperor’s New Clothes” by Hans Christian Anderson)

Those rich fabrics with heavy embroideries are men’s traditional garments in North India used for ceremonies and parties.
This picture was shot at my tailor in Varanasi (Benaras).

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“Les Habits Neufs de l’Empereur”

“Il y a de longues années vivait un empereur qui aimait par-dessus tout les beaux habits neufs ; il dépensait tout son argent pour être bien habillé.
Il ne s’intéressait nullement à ses soldats, ni à la comédie, ni à ses promenades en voiture dans les bois, si ce n’était pour faire parade de ses habits neufs.
Il en avait un pour chaque heure du jour et, comme on dit d’un roi : “Il est au conseil”, on disait de lui : “L’empereur est dans sa garde-robe…”
(“Les Habits neufs de l’Empereur” de Hans Christian Andersen)

Ces tissus opulents richement brodés sont des vêtements masculins portés lors de soirées et cérémonies dans le nord de l’Inde.
Cette photo a été prise à Varanasi (Benares) chez mon tailleur.

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What Makes It So Fine

Posted in Poetry in Fabric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

“…Then the Emperor himself came with his noblest noblemen, and the swindlers each raised an arm as if they were holding something.
They said, “These are the trousers, here’s the coat, and this is the mantle,” naming each garment.
“All of them are as light as a spider web.
One would almost think he had nothing on, but that’s what makes them so fine…”
(From “The Emperor’s New Clothes” by Hans Christian Anderson)

 

This picture was shot at my tailor in Varanasi (Benaras) during the last fitting of my brother’s sherwani.
The fabric is a traditional brocade with a Jamawar pattern made of silk and wool from one of our workshops in the city.
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“Toute la Beauté de la Chose”

 

“…Tous les gens pouvaient se rendre compte du mal qu’ils se donnaient pour terminer les habits de l’empereur.
Les tisserands firent semblant d’enlever l’étoffe de sur le métier, coupèrent dans l’air avec de gros ciseaux, cousirent avec des aiguilles sans fils et dirent finalement:
“Voyez, les habits neufs de l’empereur sont à présent terminés !”
“Voyez, Majesté, voici le pantalon, voilà la veste, voilà le manteau!” et ainsi de suite.
“C’est aussi léger qu’une toile d’araignée; on croirait presque qu’on n’a rien sur le corps, mais c’est là toute la beauté de la chose!”…”
(“Les Habits neufs de l’Empereur” de Hans Christian Andersen)

 

Cette photo a été prise à Varanasi (Benares) chez mon tailleur pendant le dernier essayage de la sherwani de mon frère.
Le tissus est un brocard traditionnel avec un motif Jamawar en laine et soie provenant de l’un de nos ateliers de la ville.

 

 

A New Extraordinary Suit

Posted in Poetry in Fabric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2011 by designldg

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“…Besides being invisible, your Highness, this cloth will be woven in colors and patterns created especially for you.”
The emperor gave the two men a bag of gold coins in exchange for their promise to begin working on the fabric immediately.
“Just tell us what you need to get started and we’ll give it to you.”
The two scoundrels asked for a loom, silk, gold thread and then pretended to begin working.
The Emperor thought he had spent his money quite well: in addition to getting a new extraordinary suit, he would discover which of his subjects were ignorant and incompetent…”
(From “The Emperor’s New Clothes” by Hans Christian Anderson)

This is a picture of the Badshah of Benaras (in other words my brother Manish) trying a new sherwani at our tailor in Varanasi…;))
This fascinating place allows to dream with eyes wide opened.
The fabric is a traditional brocade with a Jamawar pattern made of silk and wool from one of our workshops in the city.
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“…Non seulement les couleurs et le motif seraint exceptionnellement beaux, mais les vêtements qui en seraient confectionnés posséderaient l’étonnante propriété d’être invisibles aux yeux de ceux qui ne convenaient pas à leurs fonctions ou qui étaient simplement idiots.
“Ce serait des vêtements précieux”, se dit l’empereur. “Si j’en avais de pareils, je pourrais découvrir qui, de mes sujets, ne sied pas à ses fonctions et départager les intelligents des imbéciles !
Je dois sur le champ me faire tisser cette étoffe!…”
(“Les Habits neufs de l’Empereur” de Hans Christian Andersen)

Voici une photo du Prince de Benares (c’est ainsi que l’on appelle mon frère Manish avec une pointe d’ironie) essayant une nouvelle sherwani dans les salons de notre tailleur à Varanasi.
cet endroit fascinant permet de rêver les yeux grands ouverts.
Le tissus est un brocard traditionnel avec un motif Jamawar en laine et soie provenant de l’un de nos ateliers de la ville.

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