Archive for book cover

Cover of “SHUBH YATRA” – October 2014 issue

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 27, 2016 by designldg

10730996_10152898313212425_2027364960895524410_n

 

“To the Divine” is a picture shot during the Ganga Aarti celebrated for Dev Diwali at Prayag ghat along the holy waters of the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).

It was selected for the image cover of the October 2014 issue of “SHUBH YATRA”, the inflight magazine of Air India.

Join the photographer at
LAURENT GOLDSTEIN Photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Cover of “A Suitable Boy” by Vikram Seth

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 27, 2016 by designldg

1014662_10152250369022425_1272778941_o

“Out of Sundays Dancing” is a picture with four parrots dancing in the air at Munshi ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).
It was selected to make the cover of “A Suitable Boy” by Vikram Seth which is released for the 20Th Anniversary Edition.

_______________________

“A Suitable Boy”: 20Th Anniversary Edition
by Vikram Seth

ISBN-13: 9789383064120
Genre: Fiction & Literature/ Fiction/ General
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Aleph Book Company (2/1/2014)
Language English

http://read.ebay.in/ci/A-Suitable-Boy:-20Th-Anniversary-Edition—PRE-ORDER-/12133144
_______________________

• “A Suitable Boy” is a novel by Vikram Seth, published in 1993.
With 1349 pages (1488 pages softcover) and 591,552 words, the book is the longest novel in English ever written in a single volume.

Vikram Seth’s novel is, at its core, a love story: Lata and her mother, Mrs. Rupa Mehra, are both trying to find — through love or through exacting maternal appraisal — a suitable boy for Lata to marry.
Set in the early 1950s, in an India newly independent and struggling through a time of crisis, A Suitable Boy takes us into the richly imagined world of four large extended families and spins a compulsively readable tale of their lives and loves.
A sweeping panoramic portrait of a complex, multiethnic society in flux, “A Suitable Boy” remains the story of ordinary people caught up in a web of love and ambition, humor and sadness, prejudice and reconciliation, the most delicate social etiquette and the most appalling violence.

• Vikram Seth is an Indian novelist, poet and Human Rights activist.
He has written several novel and poetry books.
He has received several awards including Padma Shri, Pravasi Bharatiya Samman, WH Smith Literary Award and Crossword Book Award.

_______________________

Having one of my pictures shot in Varanasi (Benaras) used for the cover of “A Suitable Boy” means a lot to me as this is the novel that Warris Vianni, my friend from London, told me to read when I first came to India a decade ago.
It took me all that time to really understand the meaning of these pages and in a way to “become Indian”…
This is why this book is very special to me.
Somehow this picture on the cover of Vikram Seth’s novel is ending a chapter of my life and opening a new one…
Maybe this is the time for maturity after learning and making so many things mine from what I felt, saw and heard along my endless journey in the galis of the Eternal city…

Special thanks to photographer Dinesh Khanna for introducing my work to the publisher of this book at Aleph Book Company.

Join the photographer at
https://www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Cover for “Un Noël à Kanpur” (A Christmas Garland), a novel by Anne Perry

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 27, 2016 by designldg

1378620_10152873973717425_2129593875263723462_n

“Searching for Enlightenment” is a picture of the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya (Bihar) built next to the Bodhi Tree where Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, attained enlightenment, it was selected to make the cover of “Un Noël à Kanpur” (A Christmas Garland), a novel by Anne Perry.

Editeur: 10/18
Collection: 10/18 Grands Detectives, numéro 4841
ISBN 2264064269
EAN 978-2264064264

____________________

“An annual treat,” declared The Wall Street Journal of Anne Perry’s Victorian-era holiday mysteries. Now she continues this magnificent tradition with A Christmas Garland, a yuletide tale set in exotic India.
This time the mistress of mystery tells the story of a terrible crime that sets the stage for another: accusing an innocent man of murder.

The year is 1857, soon after the violent Siege of Cawnpore, with India in the midst of rebellion.
In the British garrison, a guard is killed and an Indian prisoner escapes, which leads to yet more British deaths.
Cries for revenge are overwhelming.
Despite no witnesses and no evidence against him, a luckless British medical orderly named John Tallis is arrested as an accomplice simply because he was the only soldier unaccounted for when these baffling crimes were committed.

Though chosen to defend Tallis, young Lieutenant Victor Narraway is not encouraged to try very hard. Narraway’s superiors merely want a show trial. But inspired by a soldier’s widow and her children, and by his own stubborn faith in justice, Narraway searches for the truth.
In an alien world haunted by memories of massacre, he is the accused man’s only hope.

The trial of John Tallis equals the white-knuckle best of Anne Perry’s breathtaking courtroom dramas. And thanks to a simple Christmas garland and some brilliant detective work, Narraway perseveres against appalling odds, learning how to find hope within himself—and turn the darkest hour into one full of joy and light.

____________________

Anne Perry (born 28 October 1938 as Juliet Marion Hulme) is an English author of historical detective fiction, best known for her Thomas Pitt series and William Monk series.

Join the photographer at
LAURENT GOLDSTEIN Photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

“Bouddha” by Jean Boisselier and Trinh Xuan Thuan

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 4, 2013 by designldg

Bouddha

“May you all be happy!” is picture of a lotus flower at Bodh Gaya, in the Indian state of Bihar, the place of Gautama Buddha’s attainment of nirvana (Enlightenment).
It was selected to make the cover of “Bouddha” a book by Jean Boisselier and Trinh Xuan Thuan published by Gallimard and released the 7th May 2013.

ISBN : 9782070141579

Join the photographer at
www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Dans la ville d’or et d’argent

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 15, 2012 by designldg

“Sakina” is a picture of the bulb roof of the Chhota Imambara, also known as Hussainabad Imambara or the Palace of Lights, located in Lucknow, the city of the Nawabs in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
It was selected to make the cover of “Dans la ville d’or et d’argent”, a novel by Kenizé Mourad.

 

Kenizé Mourad’s new biographical novel “La Ville d’Or et d’Argent”, published in French, Italian and Spanish, has not yet appeared in English.

 

Kenizé Mourad is a French writer and journalist whose reporting on Middle East and Indian issues was published under her real name, Kenizé de Kotwara.
Amazingly, Ms. De Kotwara only became aware of her Turkish-Indian parentage in her late teens.

 

————————————————-
• Kenizé Mourad’s mother:
Kenize Mourad’s mother was in fact a granddaughter of the Ottoman Sultan Mourad V, the Sultana Selma Rauf Hanin (born in Istanbul in 1914 and died in Paris in 1941).
Selma’s story itself was a case of fact being stranger than fiction. She grew up in Istanbul in the years following the First World War, leading the secluded and frivolous life of a little princess, but always peeking out trying to observe life outside: Istanbul is occupied by the Greeks, the British and the French.
She has a chance to meet and be fascinated by Mustafa Kamal, the man who would modernize Turkey, free Turkey from foreign occupation, and at the same time, free the country from the ruling Ottoman dynasty.
Selma and her mother have to leave the country and live in exile in Beirut, where the lively young girl is able to enjoy the relative freedom of Lebanon at that time.
Since the girl is vivacious, her mother feels that a suitable marriage must be arranged before she compromises herself beyond repair. In fact they have become penniless.
This means diplomatic woman’s work around the available royalty – after a disappointment with the King of Albania, an Indian Rajah is chosen.
So the girl is sent off almost alone to India, where she learns that she is expected to live in purdah.
Selma’s life of adventure, and the events that lead her to be alone and pregnant in Paris just as the Germans invade in 1939, is told in Kenizé Mourad’s novel Regards from the Dead Princess, first published in French in 1987, after years of research in Turkey, Lebanon and India.
This book is a real labour of love, and the authoress, who had no memory of her mother, tiptoes between the love she would have wished to express and some bitterness over her mother’s rather erratic behaviour.
Her pen-name Mourad is a homage to her mother’s ancestor, Sultan Mourad.

 

• Kenizé De Kotwara’s father:
Kenize De Kotwara, the journalist, takes her name from her father, Rajah Syed Sajid Hasain Ali of Kotwara (born in 1910 and died in 1991).
Kenizé only found out her own identity when she was about twenty, so she never as an adult knew her mother, but she did get to know her father. The painful story of this young French girl is told in Mourad’s second family novel, “Le Jardin De Badalpur” (published in French, Spanish, Italian but seemingly not in English).
It follows the girl from her earliest belief that she was an orphan, brought up first in the family of a Swiss diplomat and then by Catholic nuns, a typical Parisian student of the 1960’s.
She then finds herself in an unknown India, not as a tourist but as the daughter of a Rajah who in the meantime had formed another family, unaware until then of the existence of this daughter, having been led to believe that Selma’s daughter had been stillborn.
Although the authoress gives her heroine another name (Zahr), the book is an autobiography, taking us through her childhood and the difficult years until she finally comes to terms with a new self.
————————————————-

 

In her new book, Kenize Mourad recounts the story of Begum Hazrat Mahal it is available in French as “La Ville d’Or et d’Argent” (The City of Gold and Silver, i.e.Lucknow), and in Italian as La Principessa Ribelle (The Rebel Princess).
This is a biographical novel whose heroine is the fourth wife of the King of Awadh, who led a rebellion of Northern Indian States against the British Colonial Powers represented both by the East India Company and by the Crown.
The novel is set around around the First War of Indian Independence of 1857, also know as the Sepoy Rebellion.

 

The novel has two themes: the romantic, mainly imaginary tale of the girl Muhammadi, a poetess, who becomes wife of the King of Awadh (Oudh) and takes the name of Hazrat Mahal. Mahal is the title given to the mother of a royal prince.
Her personal story – how she has poor relations in the Zenana (part of the house reserved for the women), how she loses love for her husband and later becomes involved with one of the rajahs leading the revolt, how she manipulates to have her young son and not one of the sons of more senior wives nominated to the crown so that she becomes Regent – is not really special.
Yet is keeps the story from being dry history.

 

The second theme of the novel is the historical part, the military history, the political and economical analysis of the Indian State of Awadh (Oudh), of the unethical dealings of Britain’s East India Company, the faith of certain Indian Rulers in the British Crown, in Queen Victoria, how far removed they were, how physically long it took for messages to go back and forth, rendering the local British officers and functionaries of the East India Company subject only to their own good sense and conscience.

 

This book recounts massacres on both sides, the siege of Lucknow, the destruction of much of India’s heritage and treasure, and since the country had to wait another 90 years for independence, there is no happy ending.

 

Ms. Mourad with her different backgrounds manages to put herself wholly behind the Indian point of view, while not sparing her unease with many aspects of Indian life and society.

 

————————————————-
Kenizé Mourad’s interview in French:
youtu.be/5HCykOO2p4s
————————————————-

 

Join the photographer at
www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

 

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

Premchand – “Playground : Rangbhoomi” – Published by Penguin India

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 26, 2012 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

‎”Wrapped in an Orange Veil” is a picture shot from Scindia ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).

It was selected to make the cover of “Playground : Rangbhoomi” a novel by Premchand, published by Penguin India and released in 2011.

______________________________________

First published in 1925, Rangbhoomi was considered by Premchand to be his best work.
Set against the backdrop of colonial India–characterized by a brutal state, opportunistic, feudal landlords and ruthless capitalists this novel is a grim account of the blind beggar Soordas’s struggle against the acquisition of his ancestral land.
Weaving together themes such as industrialization, atrocities committed by princely states, the role of women in India’s independence movement, and caste and class hierarchies, Playground’s concerns remain shockingly relevant.

Capturing Premchand’s masterful handling of a variety of linguistic registers, Manju Jain’s evocative translation shows us the deep humanism of one of India’s greatest writers.

______________________________________
About the Author:
Considered one of the greatest fiction writers in Hindi, Premchand (1880-1936) was born Dhanpat Rai in Lamahi, a small village near Banaras.
He wrote in Urdu under the name of Nawab Rai and changed his name to Premchand when his collection of short stories, Soz-e-vatan, was seized for sedition in 1908.
In a prolific career spanning three decades, Premchand wrote about a dozen novels, two plays, almost three hundred short stories and several articles, reviews and editorials.
He edited three magazines, and also set up his own printing press.
Though best known for his stories exposing the horrors of poverty and social injustice, he wrote on a variety of themes with equal facility romance, satire, social dramas, nationalist tales, and yarns steeped in folklore.

______________________________________

The Translator:
Manju Jain retired as Professor from the Department of English, University of Delhi.
She is the author of T.S. Eliot and American Philosophy: The Harvard Years and A Critical Reading of the Selected Poems of T.S. Eliot.
She has also edited the collection Narratives of Indian Cinema.

______________________________________

“One of the subcontinent’s best-loved writers…the modern father of the modern Urdu/Hindi novel” (The Hindu)

Eric Jourdan – “Le Jeune Soldat” – Published by La Musardine

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 26, 2012 by designldg

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Eric Jourdan – “Le Jeune Soldat” – Published by La Musardine

“Body language” is a picture shot at Scindia Ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).

It was selected to make the cover of “Le Jeune Soldat”, a novel by Eric Jourdan, published by La Musardine and released in November 2011.

Eric Jourdan is a French novelist and playwright born in 1938.

Sometimes his books become source of controversy but they are critically acclaimed and well-received.

“Le Jeune Soldat” is published in French.

Amitav Ghosh – “The Shadow Lines” – Published by John Murray // Hodder & Stoughton

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 4, 2010 by designldg

“Embracing a Golden Heaven” is a picture shot from Lal ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).

 

It was selected to make the cover of “The Shadow Lines” a novel by Amitav Ghosh, published by John Murray // Hodder & Stoughton and it will be released in January 2011.

 

______________________________________

The Shadow Lines (1988) is a Sahitya Akademi Award-winning novel by Indian-Bengali writer Amitav Ghosh.

It is a book that captures perspective of time and events, of lines that bring people together and hold them apart, lines that are clearly visible on one perspective and nonexistent on another.

Lines that exist in the memory of one, and therefore in another’s imagination.

A narrative built out of an intricate, constantly crisscrossing web of memories of many people, it never pretends to tell a story.

Rather it invites the reader to invent one, out of the memories of those involved, memories that hold mirrors of differing shades to the same experience.

The novel is set against the backdrop of historical events like Swadeshi movement, Second World War, Partition of India and Communal riots of 1963-64 in Dhaka and Calcutta.

______________________________________

 

The novel follows the life of a young boy growing up in Calcutta and later on in Delhi and London.

His family – the Datta Chaudharis – and the Prices in London are linked by the friendship between their respective patriarchs – Justice Dattachaudhari and Alan Tresawsen.

The narrator adores Tridib because of his tremendous knowledge and his perspective of the incidents and places.

Tha’mma thinks that Tridib is type of person who seems ‘determined to waste his life in idle self-indulgence’, one who refuses to use his family connections to establish a career.

Unlike his grandmother, the narrator loves listening to Tridib.

For the narrator, Tridib’s lore is very different from the collection of facts and figures.

The narrator is sexually attracted to Ila but his feelings are passive.

He never expresses his feelings to her afraid to lose the relation that exist between them.

But one day he expresses his feelings when she was changing clothes in front of him being unaware of his feelings. She feels sorry for him.

Tha’mma does not like Ila.

‘Why do you always speak for that whore’ – She doesn’t like her grandson to support her.

Tha’mma has a dreadful past and wants to reunite her family and goes to Dhaka to bring back her uncle.

Tridib is in love with May and sacrificed his life to rescue her from Muslim mobs in the communal riots of 1963-64 in Dhaka.

______________________________________

 

The Shadow Lines won the Sahitya Akademi Award & the Ananda Puraskar.

 

______________________________________

 

 

Khushwant Singh – “Burial at Sea” – Published by Penguin

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 4, 2010 by designldg

“An Idea of Three” is a picture shot at the corner of Prayag ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras).

It was selected to make the cover of “Burial at Sea” a novel by Khushwant Singh, published by Penguin Books India.

 

———————–

Khushwant Singh (Punjabi: ਖ਼ੁਸ਼ਵੰਤ ਸਿੰਘ ; born 2 February 1915) is a prominent Indian novelist and journalist.
Singh’s weekly column, “With Malice towards One and All”, carried by several Indian newspapers, is among the most widely-read columns in the country.
An important Indo-Anglian novelist, Singh is best known for his trenchant secularism, his humor, and an abiding love of poetry.
His comparisons of social and behavioral characteristics of Westerners and Indians are laced with acid wit.
He served as editor of several well-known literary and news magazines, as well as two major broadsheet newspapers, through the 1970s and 1980s.
———————–
In this, his fifth novel, one of Indias most widely read authors returns to territories he knows best: twentieth-century Indian history, bogus religion, and sexuality.

After Nehru, Victor Jai Bhagwan is Mahatma Gandhis favourite Indiana brilliant young man with the temperament of a leader and fiercely committed to his country.
Though Victor adores and respects Gandhi, he disagrees with the Mahatmas vision for the future of India.
He returns from university in England determined to bring the benefits of modern industry to the subcontinent and within a few years of Indias independence, becomes the countrys biggest tycoon.
But this is not the only ideal of Gandhis that he defies: facing a midlife crisis, he falls passionately in love with a tantric god-woman (who keeps a tiger as her pet and has a dubious past).
She introduces him to the pleasures of unbridled sexuality, but also becomes the reason for his downfall.

Comic, tender and erotic by turns, Burial at Sea is vintage Khushwant Singh.

[Khushwant Singh] is a literary version of Osho Rajneesh . . . [the] rumbustious, Rabelaisian black sheep of the flock (Times of India)


“Rio Hacia la Nada” by Clara Janés

Posted in 7 - Events, Publications & Press with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2010 by designldg

“Pertaining to an Ethereal World” is a picture shot along the Ganges in Varanasi (Benaras) which belongs to my “Ethereal Dreams” series.

It was selected to make the cover of the compilation of poems by Clara Janes called “Rio Hacia la Nada”.

The book is published by Plaza and Janes in association with the city council of Torrevieja won the fourteenth Certamen Internacional de Poesia “Ciudad de Torrevieja” competition.
This competition attracts international acclaim and poets from all over the world
It is published by Plaza and Janes in association with the city council of Torrevieja and went on sale from February 19 of 2010.

PLAZA & JANES
ISBN: 9788401389993

———————
Clara Janés Nadal (Barcelona, 1940) is a Spanish poet, writer and translator.
Janés is regarded as one of the great love poets of contemporary Spanish literature, a designation given her by one of twentieth century Spain’s most respected women writers, Rosa Chacel.
Janés’s works often employ mystical language and interior explorations in an effort to find union with the “other.”

She studied Philology in Barcelona and in Pamplona, where she completed her bachelor’s degree, and she received the Maître des lettres from the University of Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne in comparative literature.
Janés employs multiple genres (poetry, narrative, essay, anthology, translation, photography and music), and her work includes diverse cultural and linguistic facets.
She has translated Turkish, Czech, English, Chinese, Persian, Arabic and French authors, and she has explored ancient religious traditions from many cultures.
Her work includes translations of the Czech poets Vladimír Holan and Jaroslav Seifert.
She has also translated works by Marguerite Duras, Nathalie Sarraute, Katherine Mansfield , William Golding, Ahmad Shamlou, Forough Farrokhzad and Mohsen Emadi.
In 1992, she won the Turkish Tutav Foundation Prize for her work with translation.
In 1997 she received the Premio Nacional a la obra de un traductor for her translations of Eastern and Central European writers.
In 2000, she received the First Category Medal from the Czech Republic.
She has participated in several literature gatherings and her works have been translated to more 20 languages.
In 1998 she won Premio Internacional de Poesía Ciudad de Melilla for Arcángel de sombra.
(From Wikipedia)
—————-

Premio de Poesía Ciudad de Torrevieja 2009.
El fuego de la orilla es un libro-río, compacto y total, en el que la perfección formal del verso le da unidad absoluta.
Muy depurados, muy medidos, muy precisos, en estos distintos pero unitarios movimientos se respira el sentido hindú por los paisajes y ritos que son sus referentes.
Visionario, mitológico y místico, el poemario mantiene un mismo tono que no decae ni pierde en ningún momento.
Y todo él tiene como elemento mágico la fuerza del matiz, que es de donde parte.
En su última obra, Clara Janés reflexiona pausadamente sobre el transcurso del tiempo en estos exquisitos poemas de raíz filosófica, de cariz místico, de aroma orientalista.
El lector que se deje arrastrar por estas hondas, delicadas y sublimes aguas entrará en un mundo poético propio perfectamente construido.

—————–

La magia de la India en ‘Río hacia la nada’
CULTURA — MARZO 8, 2010

Atrapada por la magia de la India desde que era una niña, Clara Janés logró viajar, ya en su madurez, hasta Benerés, a orillas del río Ganges, donde comprendió la filosofía y la espiritualidad hindú, y lo plasmó en su libro, ‘Río hacia la nada’, XIV premio de Poesía Ciudad de Torrevieja, publicado por Plaza Janés.

“Es un libro muy complejo”, confesó la autora, quien comenzó a escribir los primeros versos de este poemario en el avión tras las experiencias vividas en la India, que hicieron “hervir” su sangre y su pluma para reflejar “lo enigmático de la energía vital” y la sabiduría milenaria de Oriente.

Partiendo de la “respiración” y la “vibración” (puntos clave de la filosofía hindú), Clara Janés fue “ensamblando” poemas hasta construir un “diálogo”, cuyo tema fundamental es la “disolución de los cuerpos en el río” y recordó las palabras de Cesar Manrique: “Nuestros vidas son ríos que van al mar, que es el morir”.

LOS RITUALES DE LA MUERTE

En este sentido, el libro incluye algunos poemas dedicados a los “rituales” relacionados con la muerte, como el dedicado al “barquero” –Caronte en la mitología griega– que te guía hacia el otro mundo o en alusión a la velas que pueblan el río, metáforas de las almas que caminan hacia la otra vida.

“Lo que aparece en mis poemas es el tiempo en contraposición de lo que no se transgrede, que es la esencia”, explicó la autora, licenciada en Filosofía y Letras, quien cultiva la poesía, novela, la biografía y el ensayo.

Para Clara Janés, uno de las máximas lecciones que puede aportar Oriente es que de Dios “no se puede hablar”. “El Dios de todos los dioses es la energía vital; esto es lo más importante que aporta Oriente”, subrayó la autora.

Por otra parte, explicó que, para ella, “la poesía está vinculada a la música y al ritmo”, y señaló que, en su opinión, el género poético vive buenos momentos, y eso se plasma en Internet, ya que la revista Adamar, donde escribe esta autora, recibe 25.000 visitas al mes.

Clara Janés (Barcelona, 1940) ha ejercido también como traductora y ha servido para dar a conocer en España la obra de poetas como el checo Vladimir Holan, así como de diferentes autores turcos y persas, tanto antiguos como contemporáneos. En 2004, el Ministerio de Cultura le otorgó la Medalla al mérito de en Bellas Artes, y, en 2007, recibió el X Premio Teresa de Ávila por el conjunto de su obras. Desde 1983 participa en encuentros literarios nacionales e internacionales y su poesía ha sido traducida a 20 idiomas.

http://mallorcaconfidencial.com/20100308_31921-la-magia-de-la-india-en-rio-hacia-la-nada.html

—————–

http://noticias.terra.es/2010/genteycultura/0308/actualidad/clara-janes-impregna-de-espiritualidad-hindu-su-poemario-rio-hacia-la-nada-00.aspx