Archive for the Romancing with Chikankari Category

The Spirit of Laughter

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2010 by designldg

The Spirit of Laughter

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“The person who can bring the spirit of laughter into a room is indeed blessed.” (Bennett Cerf – American Author, Publisher, Editor and Founder of Random House. 1898-1971) This happy little girl lives in a village nearby Lucknow, the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh where ladies are making Chikan embroidery. In this peaceful place Muslim and Hindu families share a spirit of unity and a true sense of harmony. I could feel a real happiness everywhere, each face was offering me a smile, all those gifts are everlasting memories. This village was full of laughter.

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Infinite and Eternal

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2010 by designldg

Infinite and Eternal,

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“A child is a beam of sunlight from the Infinite and Eternal, with possibilities of virtue and vice- but as yet unstained.” (Lyman Abbot – American Congregationalist theologian, editor, and author, 1835–1922)

This is one more picture of that very happy little girl who leaves in a little village nearby Lucknow, the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. This is a village were Muslim and Hindu families live together in harmony and I was truly touched to see how pure they are. I took many portaits, this one is only focused on the little boy in the background. It gives an impression of infinite enhanced by the light making a game of spirals.

Ability for Life

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 25, 2010 by designldg

Ability for Life

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“The people and circumstances around me do not make me what I am, they reveal who I am” (Laura Schlessinger – American talk radio host, b. 1947)

This child was in a little village nearby Lucknow where I went to take pictures of women making traditional Chikan Embroidery. The whole village was waiting for me, everyone was wearing their favourite garments and even little girls like this one had make-up. Over there Muslims and Hindus are living together in harmony, I was touched to see how pure those people were. Finally I couldn’t help taking more portraits than close-up of the embroidery process, those happy faces were truly a gift, their ability for life is a promise of hope…

Thankfulness

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 25, 2010 by designldg

Thankfulness

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Woman I can hardly express,
My mixed emotion at my thoughtlessness,
After all I’m forever in your debt,
And woman I will try express,
My inner feelings and thankfulness,
For showing me the meaning of succsess, …”
(Woman by John Lennon)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CLGtgovIqc

This is one more portrait of a lady met I met in a little village nearby Lucknow, the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
She is making traditional Chikan embroidery.
The village shelters Hindus and Muslims families living together in harmony, everyone knew I was coming in order to take pictures and they were wearing make-up and their favourite saris.
I took many portraits of those ladies and their children, it was a very happy moment.
As I said in the comment of my previous picture this lady was shy in the begining and little by little she felt easy.
She gifted her beauty to my camera and I left this place with my heart filled with thankfulness.

With Her Weaknesses

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 25, 2010 by designldg

With Her Weaknesses

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“Women are never stronger than when they arm themselves with their weaknesses.”
(Marie Anne de Vichy-Chamrond, marquise du Deffand – French writer, hostess and patron of the arts,1697–1780)

I met this lady in a little village nearby Lucknow, the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
Like most of the ladies there she was making traditional Chikan embroidery.
Everyone knew I was coming in order to take pictures so they were wearing their best saris, the place was filled up with happiness.
This lady was shy however she asked for her portrait and she became proud to see herself on the screen of my camera.
I was touched by her rough beauty wrapped with bashfulness, it was probably her weakness…

The Call of the Real

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2010 by designldg

The Call of the Real

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“What is Art? It is the response of man’s creative soul to the call of the Real.” (Rabindranath Tagore – Indian Poet, Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, 1861-1941) This young woman is making a traditional Chikan embroidery (chikankari चिकनकारी چکن کاری) in her little village located nearby Lucknow. Creation of a chikan work piece begins with the use of one or more pattern blocks that are used to block-print a pattern on the ground fabric. The embroiderer then stitches the pattern, and the finished piece is carefully washed to remove all traces of the printed pattern. The patterns and effects created depend on the types of stitches and the thicknesses of the threads used in the embroidery. Some of the varieties of stitches used include backstitch, chain stitch and hemstitch. The result is an open work pattern, jali (lace) or shadow-work. Often the embroiderer creates mesh-like sections in the design by using a needle to separate threads in the ground fabric, and then working around the spaces.

Chikankari Like Life

Posted in Romancing with Chikankari with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2010 by designldg

IMG_5597 © All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use). The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern; it will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that; one stitch at a time taken patiently, and the pattern will come out all right, like embroidery.” (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. – American poet, physician and essayist, 1809 –1894) This young woman is making a Chikan embroidery (chikankari चिकनकारी چکن کاری) in her village which is nearby Lucknow. This popular artcraft is believed to have been intoduced by Nur Jehan who was the Mughal emperor Jahangir’s wife. The Nawab Shujaudaula of Avadh was greatly attracted by this craft and it was his keen initiative and interest, which promoted this craft in present day Lucknow. During the sixteenth century the Bengali migrants, influenced by the Portuguese traders, who came from Dacca in eighteenth century to settle in Lucknow brought this art of surface ornamentation and Chikan work came into production by the nineteenth century.