Archive for the Caught up in a Mughal reverie Category

An Everlasting Dream

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Ethereal Dreams with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 9, 2009 by designldg

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved. 
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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The legend says that Shah Jahan used to watch Mumtaz Mahal’s Tomb from this window at Lal Quila, the Red Fort located in Agra during the last seven years of his life as he was under house arrest by his son Aurangzeb.
I wanted the Yamuna River to reflect red shades in order to wrap the Taj Mahal in an everlasting love dream.

Emperor Shah Jahan himself described the Taj in these words:
“Should guilty seek asylum here,
Like one pardoned, he becomes free from sin.
Should a sinner make his way to this mansion,
All his past sins are to be washed away.
The sight of this mansion creates sorrowing sighs;
And the sun and the moon shed tears from their eyes.
In this world this edifice has been made;
To display thereby the creator’s glory.”

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Safdarjung’s Tomb

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2009 by designldg

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Safdarjung Tomb is one of the most magnificent tombs of India, situated in the capital city of Delhi.
The mausoleum serves as the last resting place of Safdarjung, the governor of Awadh and later the powerful Prime Minister of Mughal Emperor Muhammad Shah who was the weak Mughal emperor from 1719 to 1748.
It was built under the aegis of Nawab Shuja-ud-Daulah, Safdarjung’s son.
Safdarjang Tomb dates back to the year 1753 and lies at the Lodi Road of New Delhi, near the Safdarjung Airport.

Surrounded by blooming gardens, the entire complex of Safdarjung tomb covers an area of approximately 300 sq km. The garden of the tomb has been designed as per the Charbagh style of the Mughal gardens.
It is also said that tomb of Safdar Jung is built almost on the same pattern as the Humayun’s tomb.
The mausoleum represents that time when the Mughal style of architecture was almost on the road to its downfall.

Safdarjung tomb has been constructed out of red sandstone and buff stone.
Along with Safdarjung, the tomb also houses the remains of his wife.
There are eight rooms surrounding the central chamber of the mausoleum, which is square in its shape.
All the apartments in the Safdarjang Tomb, with the exception of the corner ones, are rectangular in shape.
The corner ones have been built in the shape of an octagon.

Supporting the dome of the mausoleum is a sixteen-sided base. Exceptionally splendid pavilions are situated on the either side of the Safdarjung tomb.
They are known as ‘Moti Mahal’ (Pearl Palace), ‘Jangli Mahal’ (Sylvan Palace) and ‘Badshah Pasand’ (Emperor’s Favorite). The tomb of Safdar Jung has been criticized numerous times for its weakness in proportions, which has led to a lack of balance in its make-up.

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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A Mughal’s Eternity

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2009 by designldg

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This is Safdarjung’s tomb, it is in an open room of the marble mausoleum in Delhi.

It was built in 1754 in the style of late Mughal architecture. The garden, in the style evolved by the Mughal Empire that is now known as the Mughal gardens style known as a charbagh, is entered through an ornate gate.
Its facade is decorated with elaborate plaster carvings.

The tomb was built for Safdarjung, the powerful prime minister of Muhammad Shah who was the weak Mughal emperor from 1719 to 1748.
The central tomb has a huge dome.
There are four water canals leading to four buildings.
One has an ornately decorated gateway while the other three are pavilions, with living quarters built into the walls. Octagonal towers are in the corners.
The canals are four oblong tanks, one on each side of the tomb.

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

A view of the world

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2009 by designldg

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This is a picture I took in the courtyard of the Jama Masjid in Delhi while I was visiting this place just before the evening prayor.
The place was almost empty then and I could enjoy the sunset with an amazing view over the old city andthe Red Fort.
A few people started to come, they were washing their feet in this pool and then were walking to the main dome pavillon.
There I met Hasan who recited the Signs of God (Qur’aan) to me…

The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa (Hindi: मस्जिद-ए-जहां नुमा, Urdu: مسجد جھان نمہ), commonly known as Jama Masjid जामिया/जामा मस्जिद of Delhi, is the principal mosque of Old Delhi in India. 
Commissioned by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan and completed in the year 1656 AD, it is one of the largest and best-known mosques in India. 
It is also at the beginning of a very busy and popular street/center in Old Delhi, Chandni Chowk.

Masjid-i-Jahan Numa means “the mosque commanding a view of the world”, and the name Jama Masjid is a reference to the weekly congregation observed on Friday (the yaum al-jum`a) at the mosque. 
The courtyard of the mosque can hold up to twenty-five thousand worshippers. 
The mosque also houses several relics in a closet in the north gate, including a copy of the Qur’an written on deer skin. 

Shah Jahan built several important mosques in Delhi, Agra, Ajmer and Lahore. 
The Jama Masjid’s floorplan is very similar to the Jama Masjid at Agra, but the Jama Masjid is the bigger and more imposing of the two. 
Its majesty is further enhanced because of the high ground that he selected for building this mosque. 
The architecture and design of the Badshahi Masjid of Lahore built by Shah Jahan’s son Aurangzeb in 1673 is closely related to the Jama Masjid in Delhi.

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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Shades of Green

Posted in Caught up in a Mughal reverie, Islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2009 by designldg

Shades of Green

“The oldest living city in the world”.
I took this picture last afternoon, it is the reflection of Aurangzeb’s mosque in the pool which is at the entrance.
This mosque is the highest building standing on the ghats of Varanasi (Benaras) and visible from everywhere on river Ganga.
There were many Indian Ringnecks flying in the sky and I felt I was lucky to be able to capture those green parrots.
The colour here is the exact colour of the water as it came in my camera.
The color green has a special place in Islam.
It is used in the decoration of mosques, the bindings of Qur’ans, the silken covers for the graves of Sufi saints, and in the flags of various Muslim countries.
Green has been associated with Islam for many centuries.
It is not clear why this is so.
Some say green was Muhammad’s favorite color and that he wore a green cloak and turban.
Others believe that it symbolizes nature and life, hence the physical manifestation of God.
In the Qur’an (Surah 18:31), it is said that the inhabitants of paradise will wear green garments of fine silk.
While the reference to the Qur’an is verifiable, it is not clear if other explanations are reliable or mere folklore.
Regardless of its origins, the color green has been considered especially Islamic for centuries. Crusaders avoided using any green in their coats of arms, so that they could not possibly be mistaken for their Muslim opponents in the heat of battle.

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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