Archive for the Destruction in Construction Category

A Mass of Dust

Posted in Destruction in Construction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2009 by designldg

A Mass of Dust

© All rights reserved.

All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

“A mass of dust, world’s momentary slave, Is man, in state of our old Adam made, Soon born to die, soon flourishing to fade.”
(Barnabe Barne – English poet, 1569—1609)

This is a close-up of one of those four men who were emptying plaster bags from a truck in my street in Varanasi (Benaras).
It was very dusty, although they reminded me “butoh” dancers performing with white-body makeup.
This japanese contemporary dance came after the second world war and among several things the choreography is a remembrance of the suffering of Hiroshima’s atomic bomb.
It raises the question of how is it still possible to dance after such a thing and in some ways it is easy to compare this concept of art to those workers living in dust.

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

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The Dust of Daily Life

Posted in Destruction in Construction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2009 by designldg

The Dust of Daily Life

“The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.”
(Pablo Picasso – Spanish Painter, 1881-1973)

This is a close-up of one of those four men who were emptying plaster bags from a truck in my street in Varanasi (Benaras).
It was very dusty, although they reminded me “butoh” dancers performing with white-body makeup.
This japanese contemporary dance came after the second world war and among several things the choreography is a remembrance of the suffering of Hiroshima’s atomic bomb.
It raises the question of how is it still possible to dance after such a thing and in some ways it is easy to compare this concept of art to those workers living in dust.

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

With Our Own Dust

Posted in Destruction in Construction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2009 by designldg

With Our Own Dust

“Whether we fall by ambition, blood, or lust, like diamonds we are cut with our own dust.”
(John Webster – English Writer and Playwright, 1580-1632)

This will be the last picture which belongs to the series shot in my street in Varanasi (Benaras) while four men were emptying plaster bags from a truck.
I might upload more in this set later.
Those poor guys have to work with dust all day and no one seems to care about the danger on their lungs.
This is why they kept on reminding me “butoh” dancers performing with white-body make-up in a choreography showing the suffering of Hiroshima’s atomic bomb.
Of course it is easy to compare this concept of art to those workers living in dust.
My attempt was to show a kind of beauty among what I find a painful condition in order to attract the attention on those men’s fate.

Thank you again for all your mails and comments on this set.

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Dust of the Dust

Posted in Destruction in Construction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 2, 2009 by designldg

Dust of the Dust

“What if a demon were to creep after you one night, in your loneliest loneliness, and say, ‘This life which you live must be lived by you once again and innumerable times more; and every pain and joy and thought and sigh must come again to you, all in the same sequence.
The eternal hourglass will again and again be turned and you with it, dust of the dust!’ Would you throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse that demon?
Or would you answer, ‘Never have I heard anything more divine’?”
(Friedrich Nietzsche – German Philosopher, 1844-1900.)

This is another picture from the series shot in my street in Varanasi (Benaras) while four men were emptying plaster bags from a truck.
It was very dusty, although they reminded me “butoh” dancers performing with white-body makeup.
This japanese contemporary dance came after the second world war and among several things the choreography is a remembrance of the suffering of Hiroshima’s atomic bomb.
It raises the question of how is it still possible to dance after such a thing and in some ways it is easy to compare this concept of art to those workers living in dust.

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Like Dust, I’ll Rise

Posted in Destruction in Construction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 2, 2009 by designldg

Like Dust, I'll Rise

“You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.”
(Maya Angelou quotes – American Poet, b.1928)

This picture belongs to the series shot in my street in Varanasi (Benaras) while four men were emptying plaster bags from a truck.
It was very dusty, although they reminded me “butoh” dancers performing with white-body makeup.
This japanese contemporary dance came after the second world war and among several things the choreography is a remembrance of the suffering of Hiroshima’s atomic bomb.
It raises the question of how is it still possible to dance after such a thing and in some ways it is easy to compare this concept of art to those workers living in dust.

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Fear in a Handful of Dust

Posted in Destruction in Construction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2009 by designldg

Fear in a Handful of Dust

“And I will show you something different from either your shadow at morning striding behind you or your shadow at evening rising to meet you; I will show you fear in a handful of dust.”
(T.S. Eliot – American born English Playwright and Poet , 1888-1965)

This picture belongs to the series shot in my street in Varanasi (Benaras) while four men were emptying plaster bags from a truck.
It was very dusty, although they reminded me “butoh” dancers performing with white-body makeup.
This japanese contemporary dance came after the second world war and among several things the choreography is a remembrance of the suffering of Hiroshima’s atomic bomb.
It raises the question of how is it still possible to dance after such a thing and in some ways it is easy to compare this concept of art to those workers living in dust.

Thank you all for your many comments on this set of pictures.

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

All We Are Is Dust In The Wind

Posted in Destruction in Construction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 29, 2009 by designldg

All We Are Is Dust In The Wind

“I close my eyes, only for a moment, and the moment’s gone

All my dreams, pass before my eyes, a curiosity

Dust in the wind, all they are is dust in the wind…”

(“Dust In The Wind”, Kansas – Lyrics by Kerry Livgren)

This picture belongs to the series shot in my street in Varanasi (Benaras) while four men were emptying plaster bags from a truck.

It was very dusty, although they reminded me “butoh” dancers performing with white-body makeup.

This japonese contemporary dance came after the second world war and among several things the choreography is a remembrance of the suffering of Hiroshima’s atomic bomb.

It rises the question of how is it still possible to dance after such a thing and in some ways it is easy to compare this concept of art to those workers living in dust.

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.