Archive for the Sikhism Category

Happy Divali – Happy New Year

Posted in Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 3, 2013 by designldg

Happy Divali2

Divali, or Deepavali (in Hindi – दिवाली or दीपावली), is a major Indian festival, significant in Hinduism , Jainism and Sikhism.
Celebrated by Hindus,Jains and Sikhs across the globe, as the “Festival of Light,” where the lights or lamps signify the uplighting of darkness and victory of good over the evil within.

The celebrations focus on lights and lamps, particularly traditional dīpa or deeya (earthen lamp), and fireworks. Though colloquially called Divali in North India, in South India it is called Deepavali.
Divali is celebrated for five consecutive days at the end of Hindu month of Ashwayuja (amanta).
It usually occurs in October/November, and is one of the most popular and eagerly awaited festivals in India.
Hindus, Jains and Sikhs alike regard it as a celebration of life and use the occasion to strengthen family and social relationships.
For Hindus it is one of the most important festivals, and beginning of the year in some Hindu calendars, especially in North India.

This image was shot in Sarnath in front of Lord Buddha’s tree (which was grown from a cutting of the Bodhi tree at Bodh Gaya) where he met his first five disciples.

On this auspicious day of Diwali and in the coming New year may you all be blessed with success, prosperity and happiness…

Divali ki shubhkamnayen.

 
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The Khanda ☬

Posted in Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 28, 2012 by designldg

Image

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“I have made this body and mind a sacrifice, a sacrificial offering to the Lord.
Dedicating my body and mind, I have crossed over the terrifying world-ocean, and shaken off the fear of death.”
(Guru Arjan, Chant, pg. 576)

The Khanda is the symbol of the Sikhs, as the Cross is to Christians or the Star of David is to Jews.
The khanda is like a “coat of arms’ for Sikhs.
It was introduced by the sixth Guru, Guru Hargobind Ji.
It reflects some of the fundamental concepts of Sikhism.
The symbol derives its name from the double-edged sword (also called a Khanda) which appears at the center of the logo.
This double-edged sword is a metaphor of Divine Knowledge, its sharp edges cleaving Truth from Falsehood.
The Chakar around the Khanda is a circle without a beginning or an end, it symbolizes the perfection of God who is eternal.
The Chakar is surrounded by two curved swords called Kirpans, they symbolize the twin concepts of Meeri and Peeri – Temporal and Spiritual authority introduced by Guru Hargobind.
They emphasize the equal emphasis that a Sikh must place on spiritual aspirations as well as obligations to society.
(www.sikhs.org)

This picture wa shot at the Gurdwara Bangla Sahib which is located near Connaught Place in Delhi.

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Supreme Bliss

Posted in Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 5, 2011 by designldg

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“Alone let him constantly meditate in solitude on that which is salutary for his soul, for he who meditates in solitude attains supreme bliss.”
(Guru Nanak – Founder of Sikhism and first of the ten Sikh Gurus, 1469–1539)

This man was sitting before sunset along the samovar of the Golden Temple which is located in Amritsar in the Indian state of Punjab.
The amazing spiritual presence coming from the Harmandir Sahib makes anyone easily feel that this place is Heaven’s gate.
The expression on the face of most of the pilgrims there shows a supreme bliss…

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With His Grace

Posted in Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2011 by designldg

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“The Lord God, the Giver of peace, has granted His Grace, I am rid of pain, sin and disease.”
(Guru Nanak – Founder of the religion of Sikhism and first of the ten Sikh Gurus, 1469-1539)

This guard holding a spear was walking along the samovar of the Golden Temple which is located in Amritsar in the Indian state of Punjab.
The Harmandir Sahib is the place to go for anyone in search of spirituality as it is under the Grace of God…

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Illuminated

Posted in Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 25, 2011 by designldg

Illuminated

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“From its brilliancy everything is illuminated.”
(Guru Nanak – founder of Sikhism and first of the ten Sikh Gurus, 1469-1539)

This young man was bathing in the holy tank of the Golden Temple of Amritsar, the holiest city in Sikhism, located in the Indian state of Punjab.
He left his Kirpan (steel sword) in his turban in order to keep this symbol of his faith with him and, like most of the people who come to the Harmandir Sahib, there was a real happiness flowing around him.

Songs of Joy

Posted in Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 25, 2011 by designldg

Songs of Joy

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“Sing the songs of joy to the Lord, serve the Name of the Lord, and become the servant of His servants.”
(Guru Nanak – founder of Sikhism and first of the ten Sikh Gurus, 1469-1539)
This musician was among a group of people playing music in front of the Harmandir Sahib, the Golden Temple in Amritsar, the holiest city in Sikhism located in the Indian state of Punjab.
It was a moment of bliss at Heaven’s gate…

A beautiful prayer sung by Satinder Sartaj:

The True One

Posted in Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 25, 2011 by designldg

The True One

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All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“Those who conquer their minds are beings of renunciation and detachment.
They are beings of renunciation and detachment they are lovingly focused on the True One, they realize and understand themselves.”
(Guru Nanak – founder of Sikhism and first of the ten Sikh Gurus, 1469-1539)

After taking a deep in the Immortal Nectar of the Harmandir Sahib, this man was putting his clothes back on him.
He spread that fabric over his head which allowed to give a deeper significance to this portrait.
The Golden Temple is located in Amritsar, the holiest city in Sikhism, in the Indian state of Punjab.