Archive for the Jainism Category

A True Sage

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by designldg

A True Sage

“Earth is afflicted and wretched, it is hard to teach, it has no discrimination.
Unenlightened men, who suffer from the effects of past deeds, cause great pain in a world full of pain already, for in earth souls are individually embodied.
If, thinking to gain praise, honour, or respect … or to achieve a good rebirth . . . or to win salvation, or to escape pain, a man sins against earth or causes or permits others to do so. . . . he will not gain joy or wisdom. . .
Injury to the earth is like striking, cutting, maiming, or killing a blind man . . .
Knowing this man should not sin against earth or cause or permit others to do so.
He who understands the nature of sin against earth is called a true sage who understands karma. . .”
(Acaranga Sutra, Jainism – Prayer n°3942)

This is a close-up of a Jain thirthankara (saint) rockcut statue on the way from Gwalior Fort by the Urwahi Gate.
Gwalior is in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh and its fort stands on an isolated rock, overlooking the city.
24 Jain sculptures stands there and can be traced back to the seventh century a.d..
The tallest of the lot is nearly 20 metres, and is characterised by its rigid posture and rounded modelling.

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Understanding Karma

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by designldg

Understanding Karma

“All beings with two, three, four, or five senses…. in fact all creation, know individually pleasure and displeasure, pain, terror, and sorrow.
All are full of fears which come from all directions. And yet there exist people who would cause greater pain to them…
Some kill animals for sacrifice, some for their skin, flesh, blood, … feathers, teeth, or tusks; … some kill them intentionally and some unintentionally; some kill because they have been previously injured by them, … and some because they expect to be injured.
He who harms animals has not understood or renounced deeds of sin…
He who understands the nature of sin against animals is called a true sage who understands karma… ”
(Acaranga Sutra, Jainism – Prayer n°3943)

A few hours ago I went back to take a few pictures of those huge Jain thirthankaras (saints) rockcut statues on the way to Gwalior Fort.
This is a close-up of the hand of one of the 24 statues which are standing there since the seventh century a.d..
It belongs to the tallest (about 20 meters) and it is overlooking the city of Gwalior which is located the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

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Quintessence of Wisdom

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by designldg

Quintessence of Wisdom

“Non-injury to all living beings is the only religion.”
“In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self, and should therefore refrain from inflicting upon others such injury as would appear undesirable to us if inflicted upon ourselves.”
“This is the quintessence of wisdom; not to kill anything.
All breathing, existing, living sentient creatures should not be slain, nor treated with violence, nor abused, nor tormented, nor driven away.
This is the pure unchangeable Law.
Therefore, cease to injure living things.”

“All living things love their life, desire pleasure and do not like pain; they dislike any injury to themselves; everybody is desirous of life and to every being, his life is very dear.”
(Yogashastra – Jain Scripture, c. 500 BC)”

This picture was shot a few hours ago as the first shades of sunset started to give this golden light to the tallest Jain thirthankara (saint) rockcut statue (about 20 meters) which is standing under Gwalior Fort.
The 24 statues are overlooking the city of the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

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Pranava

Posted in Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2009 by designldg

Pranava

This is a picture of a tile from a temple’s wall in Kashi, the oldest part of Varanasi (Benaras) where ॐ (Om) is written in Devanagari.

Om, often Aum, is a mystical and sacred syllable in the Dharmic religions, Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism, and Jainism.
It is the symbol of the Absolute.
Om is reputed to be the resonant vibrational tone of the non-dualistic universe as a whole.
In Buddhism, Om corresponds to the crown chakra and white light.

Om is known in Sanskrit as praṇava प्रणव, “to sound out loudly” or oṃkāra ओंकार. “oṃ syllable”.
Aum is placed at the beginning of most Hindu texts as a sacred exclamation to be uttered at the beginning and end of a reading of the Vedas or previously to any prayer or mantra.
The Mandukya Upanishad is entirely devoted to the explanation of the syllable.
The syllable is taken to consist of three phonemes, a, u and m, variously symbolizing the Three Vedas or the Hindu Trimurti or three stages in life ( birth, life and death )
The name omkara is taken as a name of God in the Hindu revivalist Arya Samaj.
Similarly, the concept of om, called onkar in Punjabi, is found in Sikh theology as a symbol of God.
It invariably emphasizes God’s singularity, expressed as Ek Onkar (“One Omkara” or “The Aum is One”), stating that the multiplicity of existence symbolized in the aum syllable is really founded in a singular God.

Aum is said to be the primordial sound that was present at the creation of the universe.
It is said to be the original sound that contains all other sounds, all words, all languages and all mantras.

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