Archive for the Jainism Category

Happy Divali – Happy New Year

Posted in Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 3, 2013 by designldg

Happy Divali2

Divali, or Deepavali (in Hindi – दिवाली or दीपावली), is a major Indian festival, significant in Hinduism , Jainism and Sikhism.
Celebrated by Hindus,Jains and Sikhs across the globe, as the “Festival of Light,” where the lights or lamps signify the uplighting of darkness and victory of good over the evil within.

The celebrations focus on lights and lamps, particularly traditional dīpa or deeya (earthen lamp), and fireworks. Though colloquially called Divali in North India, in South India it is called Deepavali.
Divali is celebrated for five consecutive days at the end of Hindu month of Ashwayuja (amanta).
It usually occurs in October/November, and is one of the most popular and eagerly awaited festivals in India.
Hindus, Jains and Sikhs alike regard it as a celebration of life and use the occasion to strengthen family and social relationships.
For Hindus it is one of the most important festivals, and beginning of the year in some Hindu calendars, especially in North India.

This image was shot in Sarnath in front of Lord Buddha’s tree (which was grown from a cutting of the Bodhi tree at Bodh Gaya) where he met his first five disciples.

On this auspicious day of Diwali and in the coming New year may you all be blessed with success, prosperity and happiness…

Divali ki shubhkamnayen.

 
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“A Guit Your” – “Shana Tova”

Posted in Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 6, 2013 by designldg

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“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”
(From “A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches” by Martin Luther King Jr.)

Amazing symbols gathered all together on a huge bowl in the gardens of the National Handicrafts and Handlooms Museum in New Delhi.
With “Om” everything begins, it is a mantra and mystical Sanskrit sound of Hindu origin sacred and important in various Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.
Like Ganesha who is widely revered as the remover of obstacles, he is the patron of arts and sciences and the deva of intellect and wisdom, the god of beginnings and therefore he is honoured at the start of rituals and ceremonies.
Then the hexagram which has deep significance in most of the Dharmic and Abrahamic religions.
In Christianity it is often called the star of creation, while it is known as Najmat Dāwūd (Star of David) or Khātem Sulaymān (Seal of Solomon) in Islam and becomes the Magen David when it is recognized as the symbol of Judaism.

In many ways this picture unites us all and allows me to wish everyone, whatever your faith is, “A Guit Your”, “Shana Tova” or, in other words, a Happy New Year.
It is easier to love than to hate, and as we are at the edge of a new conflict I truly want peace to prevail.
May this year be peaceful for all of us…

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Compassion For All Life

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 18, 2012 by designldg

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“What could have saved Indian society from the ponderous burden of omnifarious ritualistic ceremonialism, with its animal and other sacrifices, which all but crushed the very life of it, except the Jain revolution, which took its strong stand exclusively on chaste morals and philosophical truths?
Jains were the first great ascetics and they did some great work.
“Don’t injure any and do good to all that you can, and that is all the morality and ethics, and that is all the work there is, and the rest is all nonsense.”
And then they went to work and elaborated this one principle all through, and it is a most wonderful ideal: how all that we call ethics they simply bring out from that one great principle of non-injury and doing good.”
(Swami Vivekananda – The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda, Volume 3, Buddhistic India – Lecture delivered at the Shakespeare Club, Pasadena, California, on February 2, 1900)

Jainism is one of the oldest religion, it prescribes a path of non-violence towards all living beings, its philosophy and practice emphasize the necessity of self-effort to move the soul towards divine consciousness and liberation with compassion for all life, human and non-human.

Digambara monks and nuns practice strict asceticism and strive to make their current birth their last, thus ending their cycle of transmigration.
They wear no clothes, following the practice of Mahavira, they do not consider themselves to be nude.
Rather, they are wearing the environment, that is the quintessential, akasha or space.
Digambaras believe that this practice represents a refusal to give in to the demands of the body for comfort and private property.
Digambara ascetics have only two possessions: a peacock feather broom and a water gourd, they walk barefoot and sweep the ground in front of them to avoid killing insects or other tiny beings.
They practice non-attachment to the body and hence, wear no clothes, travel on foot and do not use mechanical transport.

This picture was shot along a road located in the center of the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh where several devotees were waiting for those monks.
Some were walking with them for a while, others were seeking for their blessings and spreading a devotional atmosphere everywhere.

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The Existence of Soul

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by designldg

The Existence of Soul

“Je aayaa se vinnaayaa, je vinnaayaa se aayaa (The self is the knower, and the knower is the self)”.
(Acharanga – 1/5/5)

“In this sentence, the word soul/self is used as a subjective as well as an objective.
In reality, the soul is non-verbal.
A word cannot be synonymous with the soul.
The soul is unknowable, invisible, undetectable, imperceptible and of non-corporeal existence.
He who knows is knowledge; the self does not become a knower with knowledge as an unrelated instrument.
The very self develops knowledge, and all the objects stand (reflected) in the knowledge.
In the absence of the self there cannot be (any) knowledge; therefore, knowledge is the self…”
(The Concept Of Embodied Soul And Liberated Soul In Jain Philosophy by Dr. Mahavir Saran Jain – more at www.herenow4u.net/index.php?id=67938 )

This picture was shot at sunset under Gwalior Fort where 24 Jain thirthankara (saint) rockcut statues are overlooking the city of the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh since the seventh century a.d…

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Namokâr Mantra (णमोकार मंत्र)

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by designldg

Namok‰r Mantra (?????? ?????)

“Namo Arihantânam (I bow to the Arihantâs (Prophets)).
Namo Siddhânam (I bow to the Siddhâs (Liberated Souls)).
Namo Âyariyânam (I bow to the Âchâryas (Preceptors or Spiritual Leaders)).
Namo Uvajjhâyanam (I bow to the Upadhyâya (Teachers)).
Namo Loe Savva Sahûnam (I bow to all the Sadhûs (Saints)).
Eso Panch Namokkaro, Savva Pâvappanâsano
Mangalanam Cha Savvesim, Padhamam Havai Mangalam (This fivefold bow (mantra) destroys all sins and obstaclesand of all auspicious mantras, is the first and foremost one)”.
(This mantra, Namokâr Mantra, also called the Navakâr Mantra or the Namaskâr Mantra, is the most important mantra used in Jainism and can be recited at any time of the day)

In this mantra, Jains salute the virtues of the Pancha Parmeshtin, or five spiritual masters: the Arihantas, Siddhas, Âchâryas, Upadhyâyas, and normal monks.
They do not pray to a specific Tirthankara or monk by name.
By saluting them, Jains believe they receive the inspiration from them for the right path of true happiness and total freedom from the karma of their soul.
Jains do not ask for any favors or material benefits from the Tirthankaras or from sâdhus and sâdhvis.
This mantra simply serves as a gesture of deep respect towards beings they believe are more spiritually advanced and to remind followers of the Jain religion of their ultimate goal of nirvana or moksha.

This picture was shot at sunset under Gwalior Fort where 24 Jain thirthankara (saint) rockcut statues are overlooking the city of the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh since the seventh century a.d…

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In the Self

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by designldg

In the Self

© All rights reserved.

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Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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“He who looks inwardly at the self revels in the self;
He who revels in the self looks inwardly at the self”
(Acaranga Sutra, Jainism – Prayer n° 4088 )

I took this picture of Jain thirthankaras (saints) rockcut statues a few hours ago, before sunset, as I was leaving Gwalior Fort from the Urwahi Gate.
This fort is in Gwalior, in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh and stands on an isolated rock, overlooking the city where 24 Jain sculptures can be traced back to the seventh centurya.d..
The tallest of the lot is nearly 20 metres, and is characterised by its rigid posture and rounded modelling.
In Jainism, a Tirthankar is a human being who achieves enlightenment (perfect knowledge) through asceticism and who then becomes a role-model teacher for those seeking spiritual guidance.
A Tirthankar is a special sort of arihant, who establishes the four fold religious order consisting of monks, nuns, laymen and laywomen after achieving omniscience.
Every thirthankar revitalise the Jain order.
A Tirthankar is so called because he is the founder of a “Tirth” (literally, ‘ford’), a Jain community which acts as a “ford” across the “river of human misery”.

Free from Passion

Posted in Jainism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by designldg

Free from Passion

“A man who is averse from harming even the wind knows the sorrow of all things living. . . .
He who knows what is bad for himself knows what is bad for others, and he who knows what is bad for others knows what is bad for himself.
This reciprocity should always be borne in mind.
Those whose minds are at peace and who are free from passions do not desire to live [at the expense of others]. . . .
He who understands the nature of sin against wind is called a true sage who understands karma.

In short be who understands the nature of sin in respect of all the six types of living beings is called a true sage who understands karma.”
(Acaranga Sutra, Jainism – Prayer n°3944)

This is a close-up of a Jain thirthankara (saint) rockcut statue on the way from Gwalior Fort by the Urwahi Gate.
Gwalior is in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh and its fort stands on an isolated rock, overlooking the city.
24 Jain sculptures stands there and can be traced back to the seventh centurya.d..
The tallest of the lot is nearly 20 metres, and is characterised by its rigid posture and rounded modelling.

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© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.
Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).
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